This Day in History: 05/19/1935 - Lawrence of Arabia Dies

This Day in History: 05/19/1935 - Lawrence of Arabia Dies

This Day in History - May 19, 1935 was the day that Lawrence of Arabia died in a motorcycle accident trying to avoid two boys on bicycles. To find out more about the accident and the effects of his death watch this video.


On This Day: May 19

On May 19, 1935, T.E. Lawrence, also known as "Lawrence of Arabia," died in England from injuries sustained in a motorcycle crash.

On May 19, 1890, Ho Chi Minh, the founder of the Indochina Communist Party and president of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam from 1954 to 1969, was born. Following his death on Sept. 2, 1969, his obituary appeared in The Times.

On This Date

1536 Anne Boleyn, the second wife of England&aposs King Henry VIII, was beheaded after being convicted of adultery.
1588 The Spanish Armada set sail for England.
1935 T.E. Lawrence, also known as "Lawrence of Arabia," died in England from injuries sustained in a motorcycle crash.
1962 Actress Marilyn Monroe performed a sultry rendition of "Happy Birthday" for President John F. Kennedy during a fundraiser at New York&aposs Madison Square Garden.
1967 The Soviet Union ratified a treaty with the United States and Britain banning nuclear weapons from outer space.
1992 Mary Jo Buttafuoco was shot and seriously wounded in Massapequa, N.Y., by her husband Joey&aposs teenage lover, Amy Fisher.
1992 The 27th Amendment to the Constitution, which prohibits Congress from giving itself midterm pay raises, went into effect.
1994 Former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died in New York at age 64.
2001 Apple, Inc. opened its first retail stores, in Tysons Corner, Va., and Glendale, Calif.
2004 Specialist Jeremy C. Sivits received a year in prison and a bad conduct discharge in the first court-martial stemming from abuse of Iraqis at the Abu Ghraib prison.
2005 "Revenge of the Sith," the final chapter of the "Star Wars" saga, opened in movie theaters.
2011 Katie Couric, the first regular solo anchorwoman of a network evening newscast, signed off the "CBS Evening News" for the last time after five years.

Historic Birthdays

Ho Chi Minh 5/19/1890 - 9/2/1969 Indochinese leader president of Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) from 1945 to 1969.Go to obituary »

UPI Almanac for Saturday, May 19, 2018

Today is Saturday, May 19, the 139th day of 2018 with 226 to follow.

The moon is waxing. Morning stars are Jupiter, Mars, Mercury, Neptune, Saturn and Uranus. Evening stars are Jupiter, Saturn and Venus.

Those born on this date are under the sign of Taurus. They include philanthropist Johns Hopkins in 1795 American-born Nancy Astor, the first female member of the British Parliament, in 1879 Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, founder of the Republic of Turkey, in 1881 Vietnamese leader Ho Chi Minh in 1890 Black Muslim leader Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, in 1925 Cambodian dictator Pol Pot in 1925 playwright Lorraine Hansberry (A Raisin in the Sun) in 1930 journalist Jim Lehrer in 1934 (age 83) actor/TV talk show host David Hartman in 1935 (age 83) actor James Fox in 1939 (age 79) author Nora Ephron in 1941 actor Peter Mayhew in 1944 (age 74) British rock star Pete Townshend in 1945 (age 73) wrestler/actor Andre the Giant, born André René Roussimoff, in 1946 Jamaican actor/model/singer Grace Jones in 1948 (age 70) Archie Manning, member of the College Football Hall of Fame and father of two star NFL quarterbacks, in 1949 (age 69) rock musician Joey Ramone in 1951 actor Rebecca Hall in 1982 (age 36) actor Lily Cole in 1987 (age 31) actor Eleanor Tomlinson in 1992 (age 26) singer-songwriter Sam Smith in 1992 (age 26).

In 1536, Anne Boleyn, the second of King Henry VIII's six wives and mother of Queen Elizabeth I, was beheaded.

In 1588, the Spanish Armada, assembled to invade England, set sail from Lisbon.

In 1916, Col. Teddy Roosevelt, speaking in Detroit, blasted the pacifism of Henry Ford and accused the Wilson administration of "make-believe preparedness."

In 1935, renowned British soldier and author T.E. Lawrence, known as "Lawrence of Arabia," died in a motorcycle crash in Britain.

In 1964, it was revealed that U.S. diplomats had found at least 40 secret microphones hidden in the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.

In 1986, in the first direct talks between China and Taiwan in 37 years, Beijing agreed to return a cargo jet flown to the mainland by a defecting pilot.

In 1994, former U.S. first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died at age 64.

In 2008, mudslides in China's earthquake-devastated Sichan province engulfed and killed more than 200 rescue workers. The death toll from the quake, which struck a week earlier, had surpassed 69,000, with thousands of people reported missing.

In 2009, German scientists reported finding a possible ancestor of the human race, the fossilized remains of a 47 million-year-old primate.

In 2012, blind Chinese activist Chen Guangcheng, who had escaped house arrest, taken refuge in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, then spent time in a hospital, flew to the United States with his wife and two children.

In 2016, EgyptAir Flight 804, en route from Paris to Cairo, crashed into the Mediterranean Sea killing everyone on board.

A thought for the day: Chris Hedges wrote, "The moral nihilism of celebrity culture is played out on reality television shows, most of which encourage a dark voyeurism into other people's humiliation, pain, weakness, and betrayal."


Today in History: May 19

In 1935, T.E. Lawrence, also known as “Lawrence of Arabia,” died in Dorset, England, six days after being injured in a motorcycle crash.

This is an undated portrait of him. (AP Photo)

In 1943, in his second wartime address to the U.S. Congress, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill pledged his country’s full support in the fight against Japan. (AP Photo) In 1962, actress Marilyn Monroe sang “Happy Birthday to You” to President John F. Kennedy during a Democratic fundraiser at New York’s Madison Square Garden.

FILE – This April 1962 file photo shows actress Marilyn Monroe on the set of her last movie, “Something’s Got To Give,” in Los Angeles. (AP Photo, File)

In 1994, former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died in New York at age 64.

In this photo taken on May 23, 1994, the casket bearing the remains of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis is carried out of St. Ignatius Loyola Roman Catholic Church in New York following a funeral mass. Following immediately behind the pallbearers are John F. Kennedy Jr., with an arm around his sister, Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg Caroline’s husband, Edwin Schlossberg, is visible between them. Hillary Clinton, left Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) and his wife, Victoria Reggie, center and at right, third from bottom, Robert F. Kennedy Jr. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

In 1994, former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died in New York at age 64.

FILE – This 1961 file photo shows Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, wife of President John F. Kennedy. A special summer exhibit on Jackie Kennedy’s life on Cape Cod has opened at the John F. Kennedy Hyannis Museum. The exhibit includes photos, handwritten letters and other artifacts from her time on the Cape. The curator said the exhibit captures Kennedy enjoying carefree days with her family, a different glimpse of a woman who was an international sensation. (AP Photo/File)

In 2017, former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., whose penchant for sexting strangers ended his political career, pleaded guilty in Manhattan to a sex charge, tearfully apologizing for communications with a 15-year-old girl. (Weiner received a 21-month prison sentence.)

FILE – In this July 24, 2013, file photo, former Democratic U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner leaves his apartment building in New York. Weiner is to be sentenced Monday, Sept. 25, 2017, for sending obscene material to a 15-year-old girl in 2016. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

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Today is Sunday, May 19, the 139th day of 2019.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On May 19, 1649, England was declared a republic by Parliament following the execution of King Charles I. (The monarchy was restored in 1660.)

On this date:

In 1536, Anne Boleyn, the second wife of England’s King Henry VIII, was beheaded after being convicted of adultery.

In 1913, California Gov. Hiram Johnson signed the Webb-Hartley Law prohibiting “aliens ineligible to citizenship” from owning farm land, a measure targeting Asian immigrants, particularly Japanese.

In 1921, Congress passed, and President Warren G. Harding signed, the Emergency Quota Act, which established national quotas for immigrants.

In 1935, T.E. Lawrence, also known as “Lawrence of Arabia,” died in Dorset, England, six days after being injured in a motorcycle crash.

In 1943, in his second wartime address to the U.S. Congress, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill pledged his country’s full support in the fight against Japan that evening, Churchill met with President Franklin D. Roosevelt at the White House, where the two leaders agreed on May 1, 1944 as the date for the D-Day invasion of France (the operation ended up being launched more than a month later).

In 1962, actress Marilyn Monroe sang “Happy Birthday to You” to President John F. Kennedy during a Democratic fundraiser at New York’s Madison Square Garden.

In 1981, five British soldiers were killed by an Irish Republican Army land mine in County Armagh, Northern Ireland.

In 1992, in a case that drew much notoriety, Mary Jo Buttafuoco of Massapequa, New York, was shot and seriously wounded by her husband Joey’s teenage lover, Amy Fisher.

In 1993, the Clinton White House set off a political storm by abruptly firing the entire staff of its travel office five of the seven staffers were later reinstated and assigned to other duties.

In 1994, former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died in New York at age 64.

In 2006, A key U.N. panel joined European and United Nations leaders in urging the Bush administration to close its prison in Guantanamo Bay, saying the indefinite detention of terror suspects there violated the world’s ban on torture.

In 2017, former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., whose penchant for sexting strangers ended his political career, pleaded guilty in Manhattan to a sex charge, tearfully apologizing for communications with a 15-year-old girl. (Weiner received a 21-month prison sentence.)

Ten years ago: President Barack Obama asked consumers to back his plan for higher efficiency standards for cars and trucks, saying drivers would make up the higher cost of cleaner vehicles at the gas pump.

Five years ago: The U.S. charged five Chinese military officials with hacking into U.S. companies’ computers to steal vital trade secrets, intensifying already rising tensions. A federal judge threw out Oregon’s same-sex marriage ban that had been approved by voters. Lucy Li, at age 11, became the youngest player to qualify for the U.S. Women’s Open by winning the sectional qualifier at Half Moon Bay in California.

One year ago: Britain’s Prince Harry wed American actress Meghan Markle in a service that reflected Harry’s royal heritage and his bride’s biracial roots, as well as their shared commitment to put a more diverse, modern face on the monarchy. Justify won the Preakness in foggy Baltimore, on the way to a Triple Crown sweep. Starbucks announced a new policy allowing anyone to sit in its cafes or use its restrooms, even if they don’t buy anything the policy came five weeks after two black men who hadn’t bought anything were arrested at a Philadelphia Starbucks. First lady Melania Trump returned to the white House following a weeklong hospitalization for kidney treatment.

Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.


He became a celebrity

Lawrence helped lead some of the skirmishes against the Ottoman Empire, developing successful guerrilla warfare tactics that are studied to this day. He abandoned Western dress and adopted the flowing robes worn by men in the Middle East. Smithsonian Magazine explained he did so because he didn't like wearing his stuffy military uniform, and to show his support for and solidarity with the Arabs.

Efforts to fight the Ottoman Empire proved somewhat successful, and Lawrence found himself a permanent liaison to King Faisal. Ultimately, however, Lawrence found the British government uninterested in giving the Arabs their independence. By this time, Lawrence had become a celebrity, wrote the BBC, thanks largely to an American journalist who heavily featured his image, dressed in Bedouin clothing, in his dispatches.

After the war, Lawrence, who became an adviser to Winston Churchill, was desperate to return to the army. He enlisted in the Royal Air Force under a pseudonym but was kicked out once the ruse was discovered. He later rejoined under his real name in 1925. Lawrence continued to serve for the next 14 years, once again, mainly in desk jobs as a means to escape the constant press intrusion in his life.

He left the service in 1935 and had hoped to retire to the rural property he bought years before. The house, called Clouds Hill, was a place where he could hide from all the attention. But, just two months after retiring, Lawrence died in a motorcycle accident.


On this day in 1935: The death of Lawrence of Arabia

Painting of Lawrence of Arabia, by Augustus John Credit: Augustus John/Wikimedia Commons

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T homas Chapman was an Anglo-Irish landowner. He ran away with his mistress, and moved around Britain and France. The couple adopted the name Lawrence, and Thomas Edward ("Ned") was born in Tremadoc in 1888. The family eventually settled in Oxford.

Lawrence attended Oxford High School, then won an exhibition to Jesus College, Oxford. Fascinated by medieval epics like the Morte Darthur, he took a first class degree in history, with an honours dissertation on crusader architecture for which he had travelled around France, Syria, and Palestine, sketching medieval castles.

Enthused by the idea of being an archaeologist, he gained a financial award from Magdalen College, Oxford, and embarked on an archaeological dig at the Hittite site of Carchemish in Syria. He remained there from 1911–14, learning Arabic fluently, and exploring the surrounding region. From friendships he made, he developed a passion for traditional, simple Arab culture, and he firmly rejected the modernizers who looked to Europe.

I n 1915, he published The Wilderness of Zin, which mapped the area between Gaza and Aqaba. When war broke out he was taken on by the War Office’s Map Department, and tasked with mapping the Sinai. By the end of the year he had been transferred to military intelligence in Cairo, where he worked with agents and continued his mapping work, also producing a manual on the Turkish army.

A fter the death of two of his brothers fighting in France, he threw himself into finding ways to defeat Ottoman Turkey. At the same time, he was also engaged in trying to roll back French influence in the region, seeing it as destructive to the traditional Arab way of life.

While on a trip to Arabia in 1916, he made contact with the Emir of Makkah, who was in open revolt against the Ottomans. The emir introduced Lawrence to his son, Faisal, who was leading an army near Medina. Lawrence convinced Cairo that Britain should back the revolt, and Lawrence was duly attached to Faisal’s army as political liaison officer.

I nspired by a vision of an Arab nation built on a traditional identity, Lawrence became integral to the revolt. He assumed a commanding role, and threw himself into mounting guerrilla attacks on the Ottoman infrastructure in Arabia, destroying bridges and railways, and tying up large numbers of Ottoman forces. He became the brains and spearhead of the guerrilla attacks, earning the nickname “Emir Dynamite”. Despite being only five feet five inches tall, his imperviousness to the desert, indefatigable energy, asceticism, and all-consuming ambition to rout the Ottomans, served as an inspiration to the forces he led. Slowly but surely, the Arab tribes began to coalesce around the revolt.

A fter taking the strategic town of Aqaba in June 1917, Lawrence’s international reputation as a daring and gifted guerrilla commander was settled.

In November, while disguised as a Circassian, he was captured by the Ottomans at Dera’a. It is unclear what happened, although it seems likely he was beaten and used for sex. He managed to escape, but the experience profoundly affected him.

H e was present for Allenby’s December 1917 victory parade in Jerusalem, which he later remarked was the highlight of the war. The continued success of Faisal’s army resulted in Lawrence's promotion to Lieutenant Colonel and the DSO. In October the following year he and the revolt finally reached Damascus, but the deep-rooted factionalism of the Arab tribes destroyed his hopes that they would seize the opportunity to come together as a nation.

Exhausted and disillusioned, suffering from battle fatigue and a sense of guilt at having failed to deliver an Arab homeland, he returned to Britain, where he refused the Order of the Bath and the DSO, leaving the king holding the boxes. He had played a significant role in defeating Ottoman Turkey, but he had failed in his dream for the Arabs. It was something he could not reconcile, and he left the Army on 31 July 1919.

L awrence turned to writing his war memoirs, and secured a fellowship at All Souls College, Oxford. He continued to work politically for Arab independence, and argued strongly against the French mandate for Lebanon and Syria. That same year, his wartime activities became more widely known thanks to a six-month lecture, film, and slide show at the Royal Opera House. It was put on by the American journalist Lowell Thomas, and entitled “With Allenby in Palestine and Lawrence in Arabia”. It presented Lawrence as the “uncrowned king of Arabia”.

In 1921, Churchill appointed Lawrence as an advisor on Arab affairs. In that capacity he attended the Cairo Conference in which he saw some of his dreams realised in the new map of the Middle East. But the follow-up diplomacy bored him, and in July 1922 he enlisted in the RAF as a lowly Aircraftman under the assumed name John Hume Ross. He had become fascinated by aeroplanes and the potential of the RAF, and wanted the challenge of starting at the bottom of the service. Unfortunately, the media soon found him, and the RAF let him go. In March the following year he enlisted as Private T E Shaw in the Royal Tank Corps, but he was not happy, and after two years, and the threat of suicide, he was eventually allowed to transfer back to the RAF, where he wanted to be.

B y this stage he was fascinated with machinery, and had developed a love affair with Brough Superior motorcycles. When not riding his growing collection, he spent his days testing and improving seaplane tenders and rescue craft.

H e was eventually discharged from the RAF in 1935, and retired to read and write at Cloud’s Hill, a cottage he had purchased in Dorset some years earlier.

On 13 May the same year he came off his motorbike after swerving to avoid two boys cycling side by side in the road. He was taken to Bovington Camp hospital, but never regained consciousness. He died of his injuries on 19 May 1935, aged 46.

Lawrence wrote throughout his life. His most famous book was the hefty The Seven Pillars of Wisdom. Disastrously, he left the completed handwritten manuscript on a train at Reading station in 1919, and had to begin again. The first subscription edition was published in 1926, finely printed with artwork he commissioned from artists including Augustus John and Paul Nash. The style of his storytelling was unique: a curious and learned blend of autobiography, epic, novel, and art — in some ways a medieval epic with himself as the hero. The publication nearly bankrupted him, and to shore up his battered finances he brought out an abridged edition for the general public entitled Revolt in the Desert. It came out in 1927, and was both successful and influential.

Among his other notable works are a translation of Homer’s Odyssey, which came out in 1932, and The Mint, which detailed life as an RAF recruit, but so scandalized the government it was not published until 1956.

F rom as early as 1919, Lawrence’s exploits had captured the public’s imagination. He was brave, photogenic, an amateur and maverick, dogged, and fighting a cause which many saw as romantic.

Lawrence shied away from public recognition, but at the same time craved something of the status and impact of the heroes of medieval romances. His successes, courage, endurance, arrogance, shyness, self-doubts and fragility made him a magnetic hero for a steady stream of books and articles. In the 1960s he was still sufficiently big news to feature as the subject in David Lean’s epic 1962 film, Lawrence of Arabia. He was a figure of the Old School, of horses, camels, and swords, out of date even for the mechanized warfare of World War One. And yet he has remained a figure of enduring appeal, long after his contemporaries have been forgotten.


On This Day: Lawrence of Arabia dies after motorcycle crash

In 1536, Anne Boleyn, the second of King Henry VIII's six wives and mother of Queen Elizabeth I, was beheaded.

In 1588, the Spanish Armada, assembled to invade England, set sail from Lisbon.

In 1916, Col. Teddy Roosevelt, speaking in Detroit, blasted the pacifism of Henry Ford and accused the Wilson administration of "make-believe preparedness."

In 1935, renowned British soldier and author T.E. Lawrence, known as "Lawrence of Arabia," died in a motorcycle crash in Britain.

In 1964, it was revealed that U.S. diplomats had found at least 40 secret microphones hidden in the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.

In 1986, in the first direct talks between China and Taiwan in 37 years, Beijing agreed to return a cargo jet flown to the mainland by a defecting pilot.

In 1994, former U.S. first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died at age 64.

In 2008, mudslides in China's earthquake-devastated Sichan province engulfed and killed more than 200 rescue workers. The death toll from the quake, which struck a week earlier, had surpassed 69,000, with thousands of people reported missing.

In 2009, German scientists reported finding a possible ancestor of the human race, the fossilized remains of a 47 million-year-old primate.

In 2012, blind Chinese activist Chen Guangcheng, who had escaped house arrest, taken refuge in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, then spent time in a hospital, flew to the United States with his wife and two children.

In 2016, EgyptAir Flight 804, en route from Paris to Cairo, crashed into the Mediterranean Sea killing everyone on board.


Today in Literary History – May 19, 1935 – T.E. Lawrence dies after a motorcycle accident

T. E. Lawrence, known to history as “Lawrence of Arabia” and the author of the classic Seven Pillars of Wisdom, died on May 19, 1935, at the age of forty-six. He had resigned from the RAF just a few months earlier and had moved permanently into his holiday cottage in Dorset.

Lawrence was an avid motorcyclist and on May 13 he was out on his motorbike when he came up over a ridge and saw two young boys on bicycles. He swerved to avoid hitting them and lost control of his bike. He was thrown over the handlebars and received serious head injuries from which he died six days later. His death did lead to saving the lives of many other motorcyclists, though.

During those six days in London Hospital one of the doctors who treated Lawrence was Hugh Cairns, a pioneering neurosurgeon. Cairns was deeply affected by treating Lawrence and began to work on ways of preventing deaths of motorcyclists from head trauma in crashes. Eventually he designed the first motorcycle helmets, which were adopted by the British Army in World War II and made mandatory.

Lawrence was a man of many interests and many gifts. He was an archaeologist, a soldier, a keen strategist, a diplomat and a spy. He helped lead the nationalist Arabs to victory over the Ottoman Turks in World War I.

Seven Pillars of Wisdom, which was published in 1926, is his memoir of his experiences during the Arab Revolt, mostly in what is now Jordan and Syria. During the time that he was writing (and rewriting — he lost the manuscript and had to begin again) Lawrence was in a fragile mental state.

He was haunted by the war and did not handle fame well. He wanted to retreat as far as possible from his Lawrence of Arabia persona and wound up enlisting in the RAF as a mechanic with the rank of private (although he was actually a full colonel) under fake names.

Seven Pillars of Wisdom became a perennial bestseller and Winston Churchill said “It ranks with the greatest books ever written in the English language. As a narrative of war and adventure it is unsurpassable.”


Lawrence of Arabia dies

T.E. Lawrence, known to the world as Lawrence of Arabia, dies as a retired Royal Air Force mechanic living under an assumed name on this day in 1935. The legendary war hero, author, and archaeological scholar succumbed to injuries suffered in a motorcycle accident six days before. Thomas Edward Lawrence was born in Tremadoc, Wales, in 1888. In 1896, his family moved to Oxford. Lawrence studied architecture and archaeology, for which he made a trip to Ottoman-controlled Syria and Palestine in 1909. In 1911, he won a fellowship to join an expedition excavating an ancient Hittite settlement on the Euphrates River.

He worked there for three years and in his free time travelled and learned Arabic. In 1914, he explored the Sinai, near the frontier of Ottoman-controlled Arabia and British-controlled Egypt. The maps Lawrence and his associates made had immediate strategic value upon the outbreak of war between Britain and the Ottoman Empire in October 1914. Lawrence enlisted in the war and because of his expertise in Arab affairs was assigned to Cairo as an intelligence officer. He spent more than a year in Egypt, processing intelligence information and in 1916 accompanied a British diplomat to Arabia, where Hussein ibn Ali, the emir of Mecca, had proclaimed a revolt against Turkish rule.

Lawrence convinced his superiors to aid Hussein's rebellion, and he was sent to join the Arabian army of Hussein's son Faisal as a liaison officer. Under Lawrence's guidance, the Arabians launched an effective guerrilla war against the Turkish lines. He proved a gifted military strategist and was greatly admired by the Bedouin people of Arabia. In July 1917, Arabian forces captured Aqaba near the Sinai and joined the British march on Jerusalem. Lawrence was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel. In November, he was captured by the Turks while reconnoitring behind enemy lines in Arab dress and was tortured and sexually abused before escaping.

He rejoined his army, which slowly worked its way north to Damascus, which fell in October 1918. Arabia was liberated, but Lawrence's hope that the peninsula would be united as a single nation was dashed when Arabian factionalism came to the fore after Damascus. Lawrence, exhausted and disillusioned, left for England. Feeling that Britain had exacerbated the rivalries between the Arabian groups, he appeared before King George V and politely refused the medals offered to him. After the war, he lobbied hard for independence for Arab countries and appeared at the Paris peace conference in Arab robes. He became something of a legendary figure in his own lifetime, and in 1922 he gave up higher-paying appointments to enlist in the Royal Air Force (RAF) under an assumed name, John Hume Ross. He had just completed writing his monumental war memoir, ‘The Seven Pillars of Wisdom’, and he hoped to escape his fame and acquire material for a new book.


On This Day

Lawrence of Arabia (Thomas Edward Lawrence), British Army officer renowned especially for his liaison role during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign and the Arab Revolt against Ottoman Turkish rule of 1916–18, died aged 46, from injuries sustained 6 days earlier in a motorcycle crash. Whilst riding his Brough Superior SS100 motorcycle in Dorset, he swerved to avoid two boys on their bicycles obscured from views by a dip in the road and was thrown over the handlebars. The spot is marked by a small memorial at the side of the road.

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