24 August 1943

24 August 1943


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24 August 1943

War in the Air

Eighth Air Force Heavy Bomber Mission No. 86: 110 aircraft sent to Villacoublay, 42 to the airfields ant Conches and Evreux/ Fauville, 85 to the airfield at Bordeaux/ Merignax and 36 on a diversionary sweep. Four aircraft lost.

War at Sea

German submarine U-134 sunk with all hands in the Bay of Biscay

German submarine U-185 sunk in the Central Atlantic

Diplomacy

Quadrant Conference at Quebec comes to an end

Great Britain and the United States officially recognise the French Committe for National Liberation (Algiers)

Germany

Himmler is appointed as German Minister of the Interior

Italy

Allied navies bombard Locri (Italy)

Pacific

American troops reach the Japanese barge base at Bairoko but find it deserted. This ends the fighting on the main island of New Georgia (Operation Toenails).



Strategic bombing during World War II

Strategic bombing during World War II was the sustained aerial attack on railways, harbours, cities, workers' and civilian housing, and industrial districts in enemy territory during World War II. Strategic bombing is a military strategy which is distinct from both close air support of ground forces and tactical air power. [20]

  • Tens of thousands of civilians
  • 2416 airmen of bombing squadrons (Polish Airforce in the West) [10]
  • 353,000–635,000 civilians killed, including foreign workers [6][11]
  • Very heavy damage to industry
  • 60,000–100,000 civilians killed [13]
  • 5,000 soldiers killed [13]
  • Heavy damage to industry
  • 9,000 civilians killed or wounded [17]
  • Destruction and heavy damage to oil refineries and thousands of buildings [17]

During World War II, it was believed by many military strategists of air power that major victories could be won by attacking industrial and political infrastructure, rather than purely military targets. [21] Strategic bombing often involved bombing areas inhabited by civilians and some campaigns were deliberately designed to target civilian populations in order to terrorize them and disrupt their usual activities. International law at the outset of World War II did not specifically forbid aerial bombardment of cities despite the prior occurrence of such bombing during World War I, the Spanish Civil War, and the Second Sino-Japanese War.

Strategic bombing during World War II began on 1 September 1939 when Germany invaded Poland and the Luftwaffe (German Air Force) began bombing cities and the civilian population in Poland in an aerial bombardment campaign. [22] As the war continued to expand, bombing by both the Axis and the Allies increased significantly. The Royal Air Force began bombing military targets in Germany, such as docks and shipyards, in March 1940, and began targeting Berlin in August 1940. [23] In September 1940, the Luftwaffe began targeting British cities in the Blitz. [24] After the beginning of Operation Barbarossa in June 1941, the Luftwaffe attacked Soviet cities and infrastructure. From February 1942 onward, the British bombing campaign against Germany became even less restrictive and increasingly targeted industrial sites and civilian areas. [25] [26] When the United States began flying bombing missions against Germany, it reinforced these efforts and controversial firebombings were carried out against Hamburg (1943), Dresden (1945), and other German cities. [27]

In the Pacific War, the Japanese bombed civilian populations throughout the war (e.g. in Chongqing). The US air raids on Japan began in earnest in October 1944 [28] and by March 1945 had started their escalation into widespread firebombing, which culminated in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on 6 and 9 August 1945, respectively.

The effect of strategic bombing was highly debated during and after the war. [29] [30] [31] [32] Both the Luftwaffe and RAF failed to deliver a knockout blow by destroying enemy morale. However, some argued that strategic bombing of non-military targets could significantly reduce enemy industrial capacity and production [33] [34] and in the opinion of its interwar period proponents, the surrender of Japan vindicated strategic bombing. [35]


Proposed by California congressman Thomas J. Geary, The Geary Act went into effect on May 5, 1892. It reinforced and extended the Chinese Exclusion Act’s ban on Chinese immigration for an additional ten years. It also required Chinese residents in the U.S. to carry special documentation�rtificates of residence𠅏rom the Internal Revenue Service. Immigrants who were caught not carrying the certificates were sentenced to hard labor and deportation, and bail was only an option if the accused were vouched for by a 𠇌redible white witness.”

Chinese Americans were finally allowed to testify in court after the 1882 trial of laborer Yee Shun, though it would take decades for the immigration ban to be lifted.


Why African-American Soldiers Saw World War II as a Two-Front Battle

In July 1943, one month after a race riot shook Detroit, Vice President Henry Wallace spoke to a crowd of union workers and civic groups:

“We cannot fight to crush Nazi brutality abroad and condone race riots at home. Those who fan the fires of racial clashes for the purpose of making political capital here at home are taking the first step toward Nazism.”

The Pittsburgh Courier, a leading African-American newspaper at the time, praised Wallace for endorsing what they called the “Double V” campaign. The Double Victory campaign, launched by the Courier in 1942, became a rallying cry for black journalists, activists and citizens to secure both victory over fascism abroad during World War II and victory over racism at home.

There is a historical relationship between Nazism and white supremacy in the United States. Yet the recent resurgence of explicit racism, including the attack in Charlottesville, has been greeted by many with surprise.

But collective amnesia has consequences. When Americans celebrate the country’s victory in WWII, but forget that the U.S. armed forces were segregated, that the Red Cross segregated blood donors or that many black WWII veterans returned to the country only to be denied jobs or housing, it becomes all the more difficult to talk honestly about racism today.

The historical record shows that as Adolf Hitler and the Nazi regime rose to power in the 1930s, black-run newspapers quickly recognized that the Third Reich saw the American system of race law as a model. Describing a plan to segregate Jews on German railways, the New York Amsterdam News wrote that Nazis were “taking a leaf from United States Jim Crow practices.”

The Chicago Defender noted that “the practice of Jim-Crowism has already been adopted by the Nazis.” A quote from the official newspaper of the SS, the Nazi paramilitary organization, on the origins of the railway ban stated:

“In the freest country in the world, where even the president rages against racial discrimination, no citizen of dark color is permitted to travel next to a white person, even if the white is employed as a sewer digger and the Negro is a world boxing champion or otherwise a national hero…[this] example shows us all how we have to solve the problem of traveling foreign Jews.”

In making connections between Germany and the United States, black journalists and activists cautioned that Nazi racial ideology was not solely a foreign problem. A New York Amsterdam News editorial argued in 1935:

“If the Swastika is an emblem of racial oppression, the Stars and Stripes are equally so. This country has consistently refused to recognize one-tenth of its population as an essential part of humanity…It has systematically encouraged the mass murder of these people through bestial mobs, through denial of economic opportunity, through terrorization.”

When the United States entered WWII, African-Americans joined the fight to defeat fascism abroad. But meanwhile, the decades-long fight on the home front for equal access to employment, housing, education and voting rights continued.

These concerns prompted James G. Thompson, a 26-year-old from Wichita, Kansas, to write to the editors of the Pittsburgh Courier. His letter sparked the Double Victory campaign.

Considering his service in the U.S. Army, which was racially segregated during WWII, Thompson wrote:

“Being an American of dark complexion and some 26 years, these questions flash through my mind: ‘Should I sacrifice my life to live half American?’ ‘Will things be better for the next generation in the peace to follow?’…‘Is the kind of America I know worth defending?’”

For Thompson and other African-Americans, defeating Nazi Germany and the Axis powers was only half the battle. Winning the war would be only a partial victory if the United States did not also overturn racial discrimination at home.

These ideals seemed particularly far away in the summer of 1943, when racial violence raged across the country. In addition to the riot in Detroit, there were more than 240 reports of interracial battles in cities and at military bases, including in Harlem, Los Angeles, Mobile, Philadelphia and Beaumont, Texas.

“Looky here, America / What you done done / Let things drift / Until the riots come […] You tell me that hitler / Is a mighty bad man / I guess he took lessons from the ku klux klan […] I ask you this question / Cause I want to know / How long I got to fight / BOTH HITLER — AND JIM CROW.”

The end of Hughes’ poem calls to mind the swastikas and Confederate flags that were prominently displayed in Charlottesville and at other white supremacist rallies. These symbols and ideologies have long and intertwined histories in the U.S.

Advocates of the Double Victory campaign understood that Nazism would not be completely vanquished until white supremacy was defeated everywhere. In linking fascism abroad and racism at home, the Double Victory campaign issued a challenge to America that remains unanswered.


This article was originally published on The Conversation.

Matthew Delmont, Director and Professor of the School of Historical, Philosophical & Religious Studies, Arizona State University


Here are all the countries in the world, listed in order from the oldest to the youngest:

660 BCE: Japan
221 BCE: China
301 CE: San Marino
843 CE: France
976 CE: Austria
10th Century CE: Denmark
1001: Hungary
1143: Portugal
1206: Mongolia
1238: Thailand
1278: Andorra
August 1, 1291: Switzerland
1419: Monaco
15th Century: Spain
1502: Iran
June 6, 1523: Sweden
January 23, 1579: The Netherlands
1650: Oman
May 1, 1707: The United Kingdom
January 23, 1719: Liechtenstein
1768: Nepal
July 4, 1776: The United States of America
January 1, 1804: Haiti
July 20, 1810: Colombia
September 16, 1810: Mexico
September 18, 1810: Chile
May 14, 1811: Paraguay
July 5, 1811: Venezuela
July 9, 1816: Argentina
July 28, 1821: Peru
September 15, 1821: Costa Rica
September 15, 1821: El Salvador
September 15, 1821: Guatemala
September 15, 1821: Honduras
September 15, 1821: Nicaragua
May 24, 1822: Ecuador
September 7, 1822: Brazil
August 6, 1825: Bolivia
August 25, 1825: Uruguay
1829: Greece
October 4, 1830: Belgium
1839: Luxembourg
February 27, 1844: The Dominican Republic
July 26, 1847: Liberia
March 17, 1861: Italy
July 1, 1867: Canada
January 18, 1871: Germany
May 9, 1877: Romania
March 3, 1878: Bulgaria
1896: Ethiopia
June 12, 1898: The Philippines
January 1, 1901: Australia
May 20, 1902: Cuba
November 3, 1903: Panama
June 7, 1905: Norway
September 26, 1907: New Zealand
May 31, 1910: South Africa
November 28, 1912: Albania
December 6, 1917: Finland
February 24, 1918: Estonia
November 11, 1918: Poland
December 1, 1918: Iceland
August 19, 1919: Afghanistan
December 6, 1921: Ireland
February 28, 1922: Egypt
October 29, 1923: Turkey
February 11, 1929: The Vatican City
September 23, 1932: Saudi Arabia
October 3, 1932: Iraq
November 22, 1943: Lebanon
August 15, 1945: North Korea
August 15, 1945: South Korea
August 17, 1945: Indonesia
September 2, 1945: Vietnam
April 17, 1946: Syria
May 25, 1946: Jordan
August 14, 1947: Pakistan
August 15, 1947: India
January 4, 1948: Burma
February 4, 1948: Sri Lanka
May 14, 1948: Israel
July 19, 1949: Laos
August 8, 1949: Bhutan
December 24, 1951: Libya
November 9, 1953: Cambodia
January 1, 1956: Sudan
March 2, 1956: Morocco
March 20, 1956: Tunisia
March 6, 1957: Ghana
August 31, 1957: Malaysia
October 2, 1958: Guinea
January 1, 1960: Cameroon
April 4, 1960: Senegal
May 27, 1960: Togo
June 30, 1960: Republic of the Congo
July 1, 1960: Somalia
July 26, 1960: Madagascar
August 1, 1960: Benin
August 3, 1960: Niger
August 5, 1960: Burkina Faso
August 7, 1960: Côte d'Ivoire
August 11, 1960: Chad
August 13, 1960: Central African Republic
August 15, 1960: Democratic Republic of the Congo
August 16, 1960: Cyprus
August 17, 1960: Gabon
September 22, 1960: Mali
October 1, 1960: Nigeria
November 28, 1960: Mauritania
April 27, 1961: Sierra Leone
June 19, 1961: Kuwait
January 1, 1962: Samoa
July 1, 1962: Burundi
July 1, 1962: Rwanda
July 5, 1962: Algeria
August 6, 1962: Jamaica
August 31, 1962: Trinidad and Tobago
October 9, 1962: Uganda
December 12, 1963: Kenya
April 26, 1964: Tanzania
July 6, 1964: Malawi
September 21, 1964: Malta
October 24, 1964: Zambia
February 18, 1965: The Gambia
July 26, 1965: The Maldives
August 9, 1965: Singapore
May 26, 1966: Guyana
September 30, 1966: Botswana
October 4, 1966: Lesotho
November 30, 1966: Barbados
January 31, 1968: Nauru
March 12, 1968: Mauritius
September 6, 1968: Swaziland
October 12, 1968: Equatorial Guinea
June 4, 1970: Tonga
October 10, 1970: Fiji
March 26, 1971: Bangladesh
August 15, 1971: Bahrain
September 3, 1971: Qatar
November 2, 1971: The United Arab Emirates
July 10, 1973: The Bahamas
September 24, 1973: Guinea-Bissau
February 7, 1974: Grenada
June 25, 1975: Mozambique
July 5, 1975: Cape Verde
July 6, 1975: Comoros
July 12, 1975: Sao Tome and Principe
September 16, 1975: Papua New Guinea
November 11, 1975: Angola
November 25, 1975: Suriname
June 29, 1976: Seychelles
June 27, 1977: Djibouti
July 7, 1978: The Solomon Islands
October 1, 1978: Tuvalu
November 3, 1978: Dominica
February 22, 1979: Saint Lucia
July 12, 1979: Kiribati
October 27, 1979: Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
April 18, 1980: Zimbabwe
July 30, 1980: Vanuatu
January 11, 1981: Antigua and Barbuda
September 21, 1981: Belize
September 19, 1983: Saint Kitts and Nevis
January 1, 1984: Brunei
October 21, 1986: The Marshall Islands
November 3, 1986: The Federated States of Micronesia
March 11, 1990: Lithuania
March 21, 1990: Namibia
May 22, 1990: Yemen
April 9, 1991: Georgia
June 25, 1991: Croatia
June 25, 1991: Slovenia
August 21, 1991: Kyrgyzstan
August 24, 1991: Russia
August 25, 1991: Belarus
August 27, 1991: Moldova
August 30, 1991: Azerbaijan
September 1, 1991: Uzbekistan
September 6, 1991: Latvia
September 8, 1991: Macedonia
September 9, 1991: Tajikistan
September 21, 1991: Armenia
October 27, 1991: Turkmenistan
November 24, 1991: Ukraine
December 16, 1991: Kazakhstan
March 3, 1992: Bosnia and Herzegovina
January 1, 1993: The Czech Republic
January 1, 1993: Slovakia
May 24, 1993: Eritrea
October 1, 1994: Palau
May 20, 2002: East Timor
June 3, 2006: Montenegro
June 5, 2006: Serbia
February 17, 2008: Kosovo
July 9, 2011: South Sudan


Born This Day In History 1st September

Celebrating Birthdays Today
Rocky Marciano
Born: Rocco Francis Marchegiano 1st September 1923 Brockton, Massachusetts U.S.
Died: August 31st 1969 Newton, Iowa, U.S.
Known For : Rocky Marciano was the World heavyweight boxing champion from September 23rd, 1952 when he defeated Jersey Joe Walcott, in Philadelphia and announced his retirement April 27th, 1956, during his career he defeated all comers including Archie Moore and Joe Louis and still remains the only heavyweight champion in boxing history (49 wins including 43 KOs) to retire having won every fight in his professional career.

Gloria Estefan
Born: Gloria María Fajardo García 1st September 1957 Havana, Cuba
Known For : Gloria Estefan is a Cuban-American Grammy Award-winning singer and songwriter. During her career she has won seven Grammy's and started as a member of the group Miami Sound Machine and they had a series of hot 100 top 10 hits including "Anything For You" and "Rhythm Is Gonna Get You." In 1988, she became better known as a solo artist with the Miami Sound Machine as the backing group. Her solo hits include "Don't Wanna Lose You," "Coming Out of the Dark," and "Music of My Heart" and she has also been successful as an actress appearing in For Love or Country: The Arturo Sandoval Story.


India's secret history: ɺ holocaust, one where millions disappeared. '

The battle of Cawnpore - the entire British garrison died at Cawnpore (now Kanpur), either in the battle or later massacred with women and children. Their deaths became a war cry for the British. Photograph: Hulton Archive/Getty

The battle of Cawnpore - the entire British garrison died at Cawnpore (now Kanpur), either in the battle or later massacred with women and children. Their deaths became a war cry for the British. Photograph: Hulton Archive/Getty

A controversial new history of the Indian Mutiny, which broke out 150 years ago and is acknowledged to have been the greatest challenge to any European power in the 19th century, claims that the British pursued a murderous decade-long campaign to wipe out millions of people who dared rise up against them.

In War of Civilisations: India AD 1857, Amaresh Misra, a writer and historian based in Mumbai, argues that there was an "untold holocaust" which caused the deaths of almost 10 million people over 10 years beginning in 1857. Britain was then the world's superpower but, says Misra, came perilously close to losing its most prized possession: India.

Conventional histories have counted only 100,000 Indian soldiers who were slaughtered in savage reprisals, but none have tallied the number of rebels and civilians killed by British forces desperate to impose order, claims Misra.

The author says he was surprised to find that the "balance book of history" could not say how many Indians were killed in the aftermath of 1857. This is remarkable, he says, given that in an age of empires, nothing less than the fate of the world hung in the balance.

"It was a holocaust, one where millions disappeared. It was a necessary holocaust in the British view because they thought the only way to win was to destroy entire populations in towns and villages. It was simple and brutal. Indians who stood in their way were killed. But its scale has been kept a secret," Misra told the Guardian.

His calculations rest on three principal sources. Two are records pertaining to the number of religious resistance fighters killed - either Islamic mujahideen or Hindu warrior ascetics committed to driving out the British.

The third source involves British labour force records, which show a drop in manpower of between a fifth and a third across vast swaths of India, which as one British official records was "on account of the undisputed display of British power, necessary during those terrible and wretched days - millions of wretches seemed to have died."

There is a macabre undercurrent in much of the correspondence. In one incident Misra recounts how 2m letters lay unopened in government warehouses, which, according to civil servants, showed "the kind of vengeance our boys must have wreaked on the abject Hindoos and Mohammadens, who killed our women and children."

Misra's casualty claims have been challenged in India and Britain. "It is very difficult to assess the extent of the reprisals simply because we cannot say for sure if some of these populations did not just leave a conflict zone rather than being killed," said Shabi Ahmad, head of the 1857 project at the Indian Council of Historical Research. "It could have been migration rather than murder that depopulated areas."

Many view exaggeration rather than deceit in Misra's calculations. A British historian, Saul David, author of The Indian Mutiny, said it was valid to count the death toll but reckoned that it ran into "hundreds of thousands".

"It looks like an overestimate. There were definitely famines that cost millions of lives, which were exacerbated by British ruthlessness. You don't need these figures or talk of holocausts to hammer imperialism. It has a pretty bad track record."

Others say Misra has done well to unearth anything in that period, when the British assiduously snuffed out Indian versions of history. "There appears a prolonged silence between 1860 and the end of the century where no native voices are heard. It is only now that these stories are being found and there is another side to the story," said Amar Farooqui, history professor at Delhi University. "In many ways books like Misra's and those of [William] Dalrymple show there is lots of material around. But you have to look for it."

What is not in doubt is that in 1857 Britain ruled much of the subcontinent in the name of the Bahadur Shah Zafar, the powerless poet-king improbably descended from Genghis Khan.

Neither is there much dispute over how events began: on May 10 Indian soldiers, both Muslim and Hindu, who were stationed in the central Indian town of Meerut revolted and killed their British officers before marching south to Delhi. The rebels proclaimed Zafar, then 82, emperor of Hindustan and hoisted a saffron flag above the Red Fort.

What follows in Misra's view was nothing short of the first war of Indian independence, a story of a people rising to throw off the imperial yoke. Critics say the intentions and motives were more muddled: a few sepoys misled into thinking the officers were threatening their religious traditions. In the end British rule prevailed for another 90 years.

Misra's analysis breaks new ground by claiming the fighting stretched across India rather than accepting it was localised around northern India. Misra says there were outbreaks of anti-British violence in southern Tamil Nadu, near the Himalayas, and bordering Burma. "It was a pan-Indian thing. No doubt."

Misra also claims that the uprisings did not die out until years after the original mutiny had fizzled away, countering the widely held view that the recapture of Delhi was the last important battle.

For many the fact that Indian historians debate 1857 from all angles is in itself a sign of a historical maturity. "You have to see this in the context of a new, more confident India," said Jon E Wilson, lecturer in south Asian history at King's College London. "India has a new relationship with 1857. In the 40s and 50s the rebellions were seen as an embarrassment. All that fighting, when Nehru and Gandhi preached nonviolence. But today 1857 is becoming part of the Indian national story. That is a big change."

Charles Dickens: "I wish I were commander-in-chief in India . I should proclaim to them that I considered my holding that appointment by the leave of God, to mean that I should do my utmost to exterminate the race."

Karl Marx: "The question is not whether the English had a right to conquer India, but whether we are to prefer India conquered by the Turk, by the Persian, by the Russian, to India conquered by the Briton."

L'Estaffette, French newspaper: "Intervene in favour of the Indians, launch all our squadrons on the seas, join our efforts with those of Russia against British India . such is the only policy truly worthy of the glorious traditions of France."

The Guardian: "We sincerely hope that the terrible lesson thus taught will never be forgotten . We may rely on native bayonets, but they must be officered by Europeans."


Response to earthquakes

Caldarium of the Thermae © The earthquake of AD 63 caused extensive damage to both Pompeii and Herculaneum, as we can see from repairs made to the buildings. Some areas seem to have been worse affected than others - there are cases where entire houses were demolished and reduced to agricultural land. Upper floors would have been particularly badly affected - and indeed some buildings do have blocked-up doors at the top, indicating that the higher floors had been abandoned.

But more impressive than the signs of damage are the signs of the resilience of the local population. Damaged houses were being extensively repaired and redecorated at the time of the AD 79 eruption, and there was a comprehensive programme of restructuring of public buildings in the Forum of Pompeii.

. tenaciously repairing their city, and trying to carry on with life as usual.

The evidence points to a continuous process of repairs and rebuilding from AD 63 onwards. It used to be assumed that the earthquake described by Seneca was the only cause of damage, and that signs of incomplete work suggested that it took the cities a long time to recover from the first catastrophe. But we now know from volcanological research that a series of seismic episodes immediately preceded the eruption, causing further damage to structures that had already been repaired.

So, in the house of the Chaste Lovers at Pompeii, archaeologists discovered that the oven of a bakery had suffered major cracking it had been repaired and plastered over, but had then been damaged again - and building work was already in progress to mend this new damage. In the same block, three cesspits in the street, which linked to latrines in the houses, had been dug out immediately before the eruption, presumably to restore them to full functionality.

Outside in the main street, an open trench was found, cutting the entire length of the walkway as far as a water-tower at the crossroads: seismic activity had interrupted the water supply, but people had been hard at work repairing it. A frequent sight in the excavated houses of Pompeii is that of heaps of plaster, which must have been brought in ready for new decoration. Sometimes even the pots and compasses of the decorators are in position.

The Pompeians in August 79, far from abandoning their city, or fretting about earthquakes as portents of future destruction, were thus tenaciously repairing their city, and trying to carry on with life as usual. There was every reason to: the economy of the Bay was booming, with the great port of Puteoli as one of the biggest nodes of Mediterranean trade, and the holiday villas of the rich bringing constant investment.


United States Marines (1943) comic books

Stories and art by Mart Bailey, Creig Flessel, Ray McGill, Clem Gretter and Ogden Whitney. Cover by Mart Bailey. Sometimes listed as United States Marines (1943) #1 (it was the first published, but there is no actual issue number in the comic). Action-packed fact and fiction about the US Marine Corps, printed at the height of WWII patriotic fervor. Includes the note "published with the cooperation of the U.S. Marine Corps." Marines-based humor with "Monte Zuma and Trip O'Lee," a reference to the Marines' Hymn The history of the U.S. Marine Corps Illustrated tales of combat and patriotic messages about both fronts and the home front during World War II. Trophies of War Victory at Gavutu Birth of the Marines Monte Zuma and Trip O'Lee Hellcat Out of Heaven Your Blood Can Save Him Battle of the Ditch Wildcat in the Sky The Marines Have Landed! Saga of the Solomons This Is the Enemy! The Flying Butcher In Ten More Minutes What Will You Be Doing? The Cliffs of Veru Guadalcanal Diary Johnny Devildog Super Stamp Outfit Death Sailed the Delaware! The Snaring of the Fox The Drillmaster. 60 pages, Full Color. Cover price .10.

Stories and art by Ray Krank, Mart Bailey, Creig Flessel, Wood Cowan and Ogden Whitney. Cover by Creig Flessel. Action-packed fact and fiction about the US Marine Corps, printed at the height of WWII patriotic fervor. Includes the note "Contents of this publication have been reviewed and cleared by the US Marine Corps." The history of the Black Dragon Society in Japan and its role in World War II Historical articles about female members of the U.S. Marine Corps and Guadalcanal commander Alexander A. Vandergrift Adventure with Johnny Devildog ("Devil Dog" being a nickname for a Marine). Wake! The Black Dragon Carlson's Raiders Dogs of the Devil Dogs Tarawa Tokyo. Note This Well!! He Told It to the Marines! They Did It Before. Lady Leathernecks Lt. Gen. Alexander A. Vandergrift Johnny Devildog Manila John. 52 pages, Full Color. Cover price .10.


24 August 1943 - History

Click on the images on the left to view photographs and records associated with each U-boat

10th Fleet ASW Incident Form, Photos taken during the attack and damage to PBY, Atlantic Fleet ASW Unit, Analysis of Anti-Submarine Action, Commendation from the CINC Atlantic Fleet to Commander VP-83, Report on the Interrogation of Lone Survivor

I-16, RO-104, RO-105, RO-106, RO-108, RO 116 sunk by USS England from May 19 to June 3, 1944

USS England summary report on antisubmarine actions from 19 May to 3 June 1944

Excerpt from Task Force 22.2 Report, Photos of oil slick and debris recovered at the scene of attack, ULTRA interecpts concerning I-52, Letter from CNO to Army Advocate General concerning salvage of I-52

Post-war German report on the Sinking of Royal Oak translated by British Admiralty

Photos of the USS Buckley in drydock after the attack, photo of POWs aboard USS Block Island, and the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-66

U-67 sunk by VC-13 aircraft from USS Core July 16, 1943

Photos from attacking aircraft, reports by rescue and transport ships USS McCormick and Merrimack, Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-67, Navy Department press release and LT Williams' award citation

Photos of damage to TBF and recovered air flask of torpedo, Excerpt of Report of USS Guadalcanal Task Group 21.12 and the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-515 and U-68

U-70 sunk by HMS HMS Camellia and Arbutus, March 7, 1941

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-73 sunk by USS Woolsey and Trippe December 16, 1943

Woolsey Action Report and photos of POWs, Navy Department Press Release, British Interrogation Report

U-76 sunk by HMS Wolverine and Scarborough, April 5, 1941

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

Roper's action report, Fifth Naval District report, Op-16 report on the sinking of U-85, Photos from U-85 sailors' effects, VP-82 report on engagement with U-85 in which AMM1c Donald Mason reported "Sighted sub sank same"

U-91 sunk by ships of Escort Group 1, February 26, 1944

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-93 sunk by HMS Hesperus, January 15, 1942

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors - C.B. 04051 (40)

U-94 sunk by a Catalina of VP-92 and HMCS Oakville August 27, 1942

VP-92 Report of Action with Enemy and the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-94

U-95 sunk by Netherlands submarine HrMs O 21 November 28, 1941

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-99 sunk by HMS Walker on March 17, 1941

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-100 sunk by HMS Walker and Vanoc on March 17, 1941

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-111 sunk by HMS Lady Shirley on October 4, 1941

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

Photographs by attacking aircraft, ASW-6 reports

Photos by attacking aircraft, ASW-6 reports, Analysis of Attack by COMINCH and 10th Fleet, report of rescue ship, and and the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-118

The war-time photo album of Kapitänleutnant (Ing.) Heinz-Walter Schulz and the KTBs for U-123 and U-849 on which he served as Chief Engineer

ASW-6 Reports, Analysis of Attacks, Photos by attacking aircraft, VP-74 Message Report, Photos of POW's and the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-128

U-131 sunk by HM Ships Exmoor and Blankney December 17, 1942

British Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

ASW-6 Reports and photos from this and earlier attacks, an intercepted message from U-134 and the KTB reconstructed by BdU after the boat failed to return from patrol, Photos of airship operations

ASW-6 Report and Photos from attacking aircraft, British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-135

U-138 sunk by HM Ships Faulknor, Fearless, Forester, Foresight and Foxhound on June 18, 1941 British Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-156 sunk by a PBY-5A of VP-53, March 8, 1943

Report and photos of damage and repairs to USS Blakeley torpedoed by U-156 in May 1942, ASW-6 reports by attacking aircraft and photographs taken at the scene of action and of aircrew on landing, Analysis of Attack

U-158 sunk by a PBM of VP-74, June 30, 1942

ASW-6 report, Sketches and photos taken at the scene of action, Analysis of Attack

U-159 sunk by a PBM of VP-32, July 28, 1943

ASW-6 report, Photos taken at the scene of action, Photos of damage to PBM

U-160 sunk by VC-29 aircraft from USS Santee, July 14, 1943

ASW-6 report, Wehrpaß of Leo Starzecki U-160 crewman

U-161 sunk by a PBM of VP-74, September 27, 1943

ASW-6 report, Photographs taken at the scene of action, 10th Fleet Photo Forms

Summaries of survivor statements from ships attacked by U-162, Report by HMS Pathfinder's Commanding Officer, and the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-162

U-164 sunk by a PBY-5A of VP-83 January 6, 1943

Summary of statements by survivors of the Swedish Motor Freighter Braceland, sunk by U-164 on her second war cruise, Aviation Machinist's Mate "Billie" Goodell photographs and Distinguished Flying Cross citation, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors of U-164

U-168 sunk by the Dutch submarine Zwaardvis October 6, 1944

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors of U-168

U-172 sunk by VC-19 aircraft from USS Bogue and escorts USS Dupont, Osmond Ingram, Clemson and George E. Badger December 13, 1943

Photos by attacking aircraft, ASW-6 Reports, USS George E. Badger's Report of Sinking, Photograph of aircrews, Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-172

U-175 sunk by USCGC Spencer April 17, 1943

Photos from attacking vessels, Message from Escort Group A3 to C-in-C Western Approaches, Precis of attack for British Assessment Committee, British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-175

U-177 sunk by a PB4Y-1 of VB-107 February 6, 1944

ASW-6 Report, Atlantic Fleet ASW Unit Analysis of Attack, USS Omaha reports on German Prisoners of War, Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-177

Photos by attacking aircraft, ASW-6 reports, Analysis of Attack, Press release and photographs of "This Nation at War" broadcast, Lieutenant Williams' awards, and the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-604 and U-185

U-187 sunk by HMS Vimy, February 4, 1943

British Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-190 surrendered to HMCS Thorlock and Victoriaville on May 12, 1945

Canadian Report on the Interrogation and photos of the surrendered boat

U-199 sunk by VP-74 aircraft and Brazilian aircraft July 31, 1943

Photographs by attacking aircraft, ASW-6 report, Report of the Interrogation of Survivors from U-199, and photographs of the commissioning celebration of U-199

U-203 sunk by an aircraft from HMS Bitter and depth charges from HMS Pathfinder April 25, 1943 Preliminary Interrogation Report, Spot Item No. 76 (based on information from three U-203 radio ratings), Draft Interrogation Report (shows information derived from each POW), Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-203

Photos of the surface action between destroyer and U-boat and the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of 210

U-220 was sunk and U-256 attacked by VC-1 aircraft from USS Block Island October 28, 1943

Photographs by attacking aircraft, ASW-6 report, Except from the KTB of U-256 which escaped

U-224 sunk by HMCS Ville de Quebec January 13, 1943

British Report on the Interrogation of Sole Survivor

U-231 sunk by a Wellington of 172 Squadron, January 13, 1944

Action Report from 172 Squadron, USS Block Island report on German Prisoners of War Taken 14 January 1944, Photographs of U-231 POWs, USS Block Island report on the recovery of a Radar Decoy Balloon, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors from U-231

U-233 sunk by USS Baker and Thomas 5 July, 1944

Photos taken by USS Thomas as she rammed U-233, Action reports by USS Baker and Thomas, Analysis of ASW Action by CominCh, Photos of POWs, Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-233.

Photographs found aboard U-234 when she surrendered, Report of the Interrogation of the Crew of U-234

U-249 surrendered to British forces May 9, 1945

Photographs of the surrender of U-249, BdU War Standing Orders taken from the boat at the surrender

U-257 sunk by HMCS Waskesiu February 24, 1944

British Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-264 sunk by HMS Woodpecker and Starling February 19, 1944

Action Reports and photos from previous attacks by VC-9 aircraft from USS Card on October 4, 1943, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors (Combined report U-406, U-386 and U-264)

U-301 sunk January 21, 1943 Report on the Interrogation of Sole Survivor - C.B. 04051 (69) - (Combined report U-301, 439, and 653)

U-331 sunk by Hudson aircraft of 500 Squadron and an Albacore of 820 Squadron from HMS Formidable, November 17, 1942 British Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-335 sunk by HM Submarine P247 August 3, 1943

British Report on the Interrogation of Sole Survivor

U-340 sunk by HMS Fleetwood, Active and Witherington and a British Wellington aircraft of 179 Squadron, November 2, 1943 British Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

Photos of POW's arriving at Charleston SC, USCGC Icarus Action Report and the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-352

U-353 sunk by HMS. Fame October 16, 1942

British Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-355's KTB for the period from August 25, 1942 to March 6, 1943

U-357 sunk by HMS Hesperus and Vanessa December 26, 1942

British Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-358 sunk by Escort Group 1 - HMS Gould, Affleck, Gore and Garlies March 1, 1944 British Report on the Interrogation of Sole Survivor

USS Pride Action Report, Photos of USS Menges, Photos of POWs arriving in Algiers, Algeria, Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-371, Photos taken from POWs

U-374 sunk by HMS Unbeaten January 12, 1942

Report on the Interrogation of Sole Survivor

Photos by attacking aircraft and ASW-6 report.

U-379 sunk by HMS Dianthus August 9, 1942

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-386 sunk by HMS Spey February 19, 1944

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors (Combined report U-406, U-386 and U-264)

U-402 sunk by VC-9 aircraft from USS Card October 13, 1943

Records include: Photographs by attacking aircraft and ASW-6 reports, p hotographs of U-402 from the Bibliothek für Zeitgeschichte in Stuttgart, Germany , from Mike McCarthy's collection and the personal albums of Obermaat Walter Friebolin

U-406 sunk by HMS Spey February 18, 1944

Action Reports and photos from previous attacks by VP-204 and VC-13 aircraft from USS Card on August, 23 and July 30, 1943, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors (Combined report U-406, U-386 and U-264)

U-409 sunk by HMS Inconstant, July 12, 1943 Inconstant Action Report and Photos, Information on German U-boats and German U-boat Activity in the Mediterranean , Preliminary Interrogation Report by the CSDIC - AFHQ, Report from LT Plaut, Naval Section, CSDIC - AFHQ to CDR Riheldaffer Op-16-Z, Photos of U-409 POWs, Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-409

U-427's KTB for the period May 6, 1944 to May 3, 1945

U-432 sunk by FFS Aconit March 11, 1943

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-433 sunk by HMS Marigold November 16, 1941

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-434 sunk sunk by HM Ships Stanley and Blankney December 18, 1941

Action report and Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-439 sunk May 4, 1943 Report on the Interrogation of Survivors - C.B. 04051 (69) - (Combined report U-301, 439, and 653)

U-444 sunk sunk by HMS Harvester and FFS Aconit March 11, 1943

Action report and Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-451 sunk by a Swordfish aircraft of 812 Squadron December 21, 1941

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-453 sunk by HMS Termagant, Tenacious and Liddesdale May 21, 1944

Photographs from POWs personal effects, Report of interrogation of Survivors of U-453

U-454 sunk by a Sunderland of 10 Squadron RAF August 1, 1943

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-459 sunk by two Wellingtons of 172 and 547 Squadrons RAF July 24, 1943

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-461 sunk by a Sunderland of 461 Squadron RAAF July 30, 1943

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-462 sunk by Halifax "S" of 502 Squadron July 30, 1943

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-464 sunk by Catalinia of VP-73 August 20, 1942

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-468 sunk by Liberator "D" of 200 Squadron 11 August, 1943

British Report of the Interrogation of Su rvivors

U-470 sunk by Liberators of 120 and 59 Squadron 16 October, 1943

British Report of the Interrogation of Su rvivors (Combined report U-470 and U-533)

U-472 sunk by a Swordfish of 816 Squadron from HMS Chaser and the destroyer HMS Onslaught, March 4, 1944 British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors (Combined report U-472 and U-973)

U-473 sunk by ships of the 2nd Escort Group 6 May 1944

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors (Combined report U-473 and U-765)

U-485 surrendered to the British May 8, 1945

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors (Combined report U-485, U 541 & U-963)

U-489 sunk by a Hudson of 269 Squadron RAF and a Sunderland of 423 Squadron RCAF on August 4, 1943 British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

Photos of POWs aboard USS Croatan and photos taken from POWs, Report of Anti-submarine Action of USS Frost, and the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-490

U-501 sunk by Canadian corvettes HMCS Chambly and Moosejaw September 11, 1941 British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

Second Support Group Report of Proceedings 23rd July to 6th August 1943

U-506 sunk by a by a B-24D of 1st Squadron, 480th Antisubmarine Group July 12, 1943

Action report and photographs of the sinking of U-506 , British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-512 sunk by a B-18A aircraft of the 99th Bombardment Squadron on October 3, 1942

Message report from NOB Trinidad, Report of the USS Ellis, Summary of an interrogation of the survivor and the Report of the Interrogation of the Sole Survivor of U-512

U-513 sunk by a PBM-3 aircraft of VP-74 on July 19, 1943

Narrative from ASW-6 report, USS Barnegat report on Prisoners of War from German Submarine, Preliminary Interrogation Report and the "Post Mortems on Enemy Submarines" - Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-513

U-515 sunk by VC-58 aircraft and USS Guadalcanal escorts on April 9, 1944 Photos from attacking aircraft and ships, Reports by attacking ships, Statements signed by Kapitänleutnant Henke and the crew of U-515, Excerpt of Report of USS Guadalcanal Task Group 21.12, the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-515 and U-68 and photos of U-515 crew members at their annual reunions

U-517 sunk by 817 Squadron aircraft of HMS Victorious November 21, 1942

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-521 sunk by PC 565 June 2, 1943

ASW-1 Report of Anti-submarine Action, Third Naval District Report of Sinking of U-521, COMINCH Brief of Attack on Enemy Submarine, Photos of PC 565 and crew, Report of the Interrogation of Sole Survivor of U-521

U-523 sunk by HMS Wanderer August 25, 1943

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-524 sunk by a B-24D of the 480th Antisubmarine Group, March 22, 1943

ASW-6 Report and photographs from the attacking aircraft

U-527 sunk by a VC-9 aircraft from USS Bogue, July 23, 1943 Photos from attacking aircraft, Preliminary Interrogation report by LT Plaut of Op-16-Z (temporarily attached to Moroccan Sea Frontier), Letters from LT Plaut concerning irregularities in the handling of POWs, Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-527 and Post Mortems on Enemy Submarine - Interrogation of Survivors of U-527

U-528 sunk by HMS Fleetwood May 11, 1943

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-530 surrendered to Argentine forces at Mar del Plata July 10, 1945 Photos from Argentinean newspaper of the arrival of U-530 at Mar del Plata, US Naval Attache observation of Argentine Navy interrogation of prisoners from U-530, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors from U-530, Photos of the boat and her US Navy crew, Photos of the sinking of U-530 by USS Toro

U-532 surrendered on 13 May 1945 at Loch Eriboll, Scotland

Photos taken during the boat's first war patrol and the KTB from the patrol

U-533 sunk by aircraft in the Persian Gulf 16 October, 1943

British Report of the Interrogation of Su rvivors (Combined report U-470 and U-533)

U-536 sunk by HMS Nene assisted by HMCS Snowberry and Calgary November 20, 1943

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-541 surrendered to British forces May 14, 1945

British Report of the Interrogation of S urvivors (Combined report U-485, U 541 & U-963)

U-544, U-129 and U-516 attacked by VC-13 aircraft from USS Guadalcanal January 16, 1944

Photos from attacking aircraft, Photo of aircrews, Logbook of U-516 which was nearby at the time of the attack.

U-550 sunk by the DEs USS Joyce, Gandy and Peterson April 16, 1944

Action reports from the attacking ships, Photos taken at the scene of action

U-556 sunk by HMS Nasturtium, Celandine and Gladiolus July 27, 1941

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-558 sunk by a Liberator of the 19th A/S Squadron USAAC July 20, 1943

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

Photos by attacking aircraft, ASW-6 reports, Analysis of ASW Attacks

Photos by aircraft subsequent to the surrender, ONI report (with photos, design and specification book and general plan) by USN officers who inspected U-570 in Iceland shortly after the surrender, British Report on U-570, British Interrogation Report

U-574 sunk HMS Stork December 19, 1941

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-581 sunk February 2, 1942

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors - C.B. 04051 (42)

U-591 was sunk by a PV-1 of VB-127, July 30, 1943

ASW-6 report and photos from attacking aircraft, Preliminary Interrogation report on 4th Fleet letterhead, Photos of POWs arriving at NOB Norfolk, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors from U-591

U-593 sunk by USS Wainwright and HMS Calpe, December 13, 1943 Reports concerning an attack in May 1942 by the 393rd Bombing Squadron, Photographs of the sinking SS Persephone in May 1942 , Extracts of Action Reports from Wainwright and Calpe, Navy Department Press Release and British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-595 beached after attacks by Hudson aircraft of 608 and 500 Squadron RAF November 14, 1942 Report of attacking aircraft, Statement by Kapitänleutnant Quaet-Faslem, Screening of POWs, Preliminary Interrogation Report, Charge of Violation of the Geneva Convention by Quaet-Faslem, Assembled Interrogations of two U-595 POWs, Sample of Intercepted Mail and the Report on the Interrogation of Survivors of U-595

U-598 attacked and sunk by PB4Y-1's of VB-107, July 23, 1943

ASW-6 reports from attacking aircraft, endorsement of ASW-6 reports by 4th Fleet concerning explosion of DCs on contact resulting in the loss of 107-B-6, Preliminary Interrogation Report, Report on the Interrogation of Survivor from U-598

U-604 attacked by aircraft of VB-129 and VB-107 July 30, 1943 - Scuttled August 11, 1943 Photos by attacking aircraft, ASW-6 reports, Analysis of ASW Attack, Fleet Air Wing Sixteen Report, Preliminary Report of the Interrogation of Survivors from U-604, Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-604 and U-185, Photos of Bootsmaat Peter Binnefeld, and Funkmaat Georg Seitz

U-606 sunk by the Polish destroyer Burza assisted by USCGC Campbell, February 22, 1943 ORP Burza Report of Proceedings, Photos of Campbell's repair party, Letter from DNI, Ottawa to Op-16-Z, Photos of U-606 POWs, Preliminary interrogation Report, Draft of Chapter VII (Sinking of U-606) of the interrogation report, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors of U-606, CDR Hirshfield Photos and Navy Cross citation

U-607 sunk by a Sunderland of 228 Squadron R.A.F. July 13, 1943

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-615 scuttled August 7, 1943 after attacks by PBM, PV and B-18 aircraft, beginning August 5, 1943 ASW-6 Reports and photos from attacking aircraft, Photos from POWs, Notes on discussions with Herbert Skora -Engineer Officer of U 615, Report of Interrogation of Survivors of U-615 , History of U-615 by Herbert Schlipper -First Watch Officer of U-615

U-616 sunk by US destroyers Nields, Gleaves, Ellyson, Macomb, Hambleton, Rodman and Emmons, and depth charges from a British Wellington aircraft of 36 Squadron May 17, 1944

Photographs from POWs personal effects, Report of interrogation of Survivors of U-616

U-632 sunk by a Liberator of 86 Squadron R.A.F. April 6, 1943

Photos of the attack and Assessment Report.

U-643 sunk by a Liberator of 120 Squadron R.A.F. October 8, 1943

British Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-651 sunk by HM Ships Malcolm, Scimitar, Arabis, Violet and Speedwell June 29, 1941 British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-656 sunk by a Lockheed Hudson PBO aircraft of VP-82 on March 1, 1942

Reports and photos from attacking aircraft

U-659 sunk May 4, 1943 Report on the Interrogation of Survivors - C.B. 04051 (69) - (Combined report U-301, 439, and 653)

U-660 sunk by HMS Starwort November 12, 1942

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors

U-662 sunk by aircraft of VP-94 on 21 July 1943 ASW-6 Reports and photos from attacking aircraft, Preliminary Interrogation Report, Spot Intelligence Reports based on interrogation of U-662 crewmen, Memo of Interview of Kapitänleutnant Müller by LCDR Albrecht aka CDR Norden, Report of Interrogation of Survivors of U-662.

U-664 sunk by VC-1 aircraft of USS Card, August 9, 1943 ASW-6 Reports and photos from attacking aircraft , Photos of POWs, Memo for CDR Riheldaffer, Op-16-Z from LT Plaut, Naval Section CSDIC - AFHQ, Preliminary Interrogation Report, Memo for COMINCH F-21 from CDR Riheldaffer concerning possibility that U-664 attacked USS Card, Report of Interrogation of Survivors of U-664

U-701 sunk by an A-29 of the 396th Bomb Squadron July 7, 1942 O rders for mining Norfolk, minefield victims photos and ESF War Diary entry, Messages and reports from attacking aircraft and photos of the rescue of survivors, Preliminary Interrogation Report, Transcripts of room conversations and interrogations at the Joint Interrogation Center, Report of Interrogation of Survivors of U-701, Personal photos

U-706 sunk by a Liberator of 4th A/S Squadron, August 2, 1943

R eport on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-732 sunk by HMS Douglas, 31 March, 1943

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-744 sunk by ships of Support Group 2, 8 March, 1944

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-752 sunk by 819 & 892 Squadron aircraft from HMS Archer, May 23, 1943

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-756 sunk by the corvette HMCS Morden on 1 September 1942 The boat's KTB for workups and her 1st and final patrol, Report of proceedings from HMCS Morden , Precis of attack by HMCS Morden , Post war reassessment of attack by HMCS Morden, Personal photographs of Obersteuermann Kurt Joest

U-761 sunk by PBY-5As of VP-63 and the destroyers HMS Wishart and Anthony, February 24, 1944 ASW-6 reports and photographs from attacking aircraft, Interrogation of Commanding Officer of U-761, Questions for P/W Ex - U-761, Spot Item, Attempted Passage Through the Straits of Gibraltar, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors of U-761

U-765 sunk by a Swordfish of H.M.S. Vindex and ships of the 5th Escort Group 6 May 1944 British Report of the Interrogation of Su rvivors (Combined report U-473 and U-765)

U-801 sunk by VC-6 aircraft of USS Block Island and depth charges from USS Corry and Bronstein March 17, 1944 Action reports from USS Corry and Bronstein, USS Block Island report on German POWs and a report on Heinrich Töller, Photos of POWs, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors of U-801 and Photos and Award Citations of LTJG Norman Dowty

U-805 surrendered to U.S. forces on May 12, 1945

Report of Commander Task Group 22.8, Preliminary Interrogation Report, Color photos of U-805 arriving at Portsmouth, New Hampshire and of the crew at the Navy Yard and the POW ID Card of Korvettenkapitän Richard Bernardelli

U-841 sunk by HMS Byard, October 17, 1943 HMS Byard Action Report, HMS Byard Report to DNI Admiralty concerning POWs, Photos of POWs in St. Johns, Newfoundland, Memo for the District Intelligence Officer concerning POWs Landed at Boston from HMCS Georgetown, Excerpt of draft Report of Interrogation, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors from U-841and U-848

U-845 sunk by HMCS St. Laurent, Owen Sound and Swansea and HMS Forester of Escort Group C2, March 10, 1944

Report on the Interrogation of Survivors

U-848 sunk by aircraft of VB-107 and 1st Composite Squadron USAAC November 5, 1943 Report of LTJG Mullen OP-16-Z, Photos by attacking aircraft, ASW-6 reports, Analysis of ASW Attacks, Photos of Funeral of Oberbootsmann Hans Schade, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors from U-841 and U-848

U-849 sunk by a PB4Y-1 of VB-107 November 25, 1943

ASW-6 report, Photos taken at the scene of action

U-853 sunk by USS Atherton and Moberly May 5,1945

Report of Task Group 60.7 Commander, Photos taken during attacks made on May 6, Photos of debris recovered at the scene of attack, report of Divers' Examination

U-856 sunk April 7, 1944 by VC-42 aircraft of USS Croatan and her escorts USS Boyle, Huse and Champlin Atlantic Fleet ASW Unit, Analysis of Coordinated Anti-Submarine Action, Photos of the final attack, funeral service for USS Champlin CO and VC-42 award ceremony, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors from U-856

U-858 surrendered to USS Pillsbury and Pope May 10, 1944

Naval Messages concerning her surrender, Photographs of her arrival off Cape May, New Jersey and of her crew being transferred ashore at Fort Miles, Delaware, Preliminary Report of Interrogation of her crew

U-860 sunk by VC-9 aircraft from USS Solomons June 15, 1944

Photographs by attacking aircraft and ASW-6 reports with endorsements, Preliminary Report of Interrogation of Survivors, Report of Interrogation of Survivors of U-860

U-869 sunk by the DEs USS Crow and Koiner February 11, 1945

Deck Logs of the attacking ships and excerpts from Admiralty/COMINCH Serial messages pertaining to U-869

U-873 surrendered to U.S. forces May 11, 1945 Message from ComCortDiv, Interrogation notes Kapitänleutnant Steinhoff, Message report of Preliminary Investigation, Preliminary Investigation Report, Death Certificate of Steinhoff, Provost Marshal Report on Transfer of Prisoners, Report of the Navy Inspector General, Follow Up by Chief of Naval Operations and Secretary of the Navy

U-889 surrendered to Canadian forces May 10, 1945

Naval messages from Canadian authorities concerning surrender, Naval message report of preliminary investigation, Canadian Interrogation Report, Photos of the boat's snorkel installation from Naval Technical Mission in Europe, Report Number 617-45

U-960 sunk by the destroyers USS Niblack and Ludlow and British Wellingtons (36 Squadron) and Venturas (500 Squadron) March 19, 1944

USS Niblack and Ludlow action reports, Photographs from POW's personal effects, Report of the Interrogation of Prisoners from U-960

U-963 scuttled May 20, 1945 after damage from an aircraft attack

British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors (Combined report U-485, U 541 & U-963)

U-966 scuttled after attacks by Liberators of VB-110, VB-103 and 311 Squadron November 10, 1943

Action Report and Photographs from VB-110 aircraft, UK Assessment Committee Precis of Attack, Fleet Air Wing Seven Weekly Report, OSS Spain Report

U-971 sunk by Czech Liberator aircraft of Squadron 311 and the destroyers HMCS Haida and HMS Eskimo June 24, 1944

Action reports from HMCS Haida and HMS Eskimo with information obtained from prisoners

U-973 sunk by a Swordfish of 816 Squadron from HMS Chaser, March 6, 1944 British Report of the Interrogation of Survivors (Combined report U-472 and U-973)

U-977 surrendered At Mar Del Plata, August 17, 1945

Photo of the destruction of U-977 and the Report of the Interrogation of Prisoners from U-977

U-979 scuttled at Amrum, Germany, August 24, 1945

British report on the Interrogation of the First Lieutenant - includes extract of the U-boat's Deck Log for her final patrol

U-1059 was sunk March 19, 1944 by VC-6 aircraft of USS Block Island CTG 21.16 Naval message, Report on German POWs and Cruise Report Track Charts, Photos of torpedo recovered by USS Corry, Atlantic Fleet ASW Unit, Analysis of Anti-Submarine Action by Aircraft, Report on the Interrogation of Survivors from U-1059, Navy Department, Memo to the Press and Photos and Award Citations of LTJG Norman Dowty

U-1062 sunk by USS Fessenden of TG 22.1 (Mission Bay), September 30, 1944

Action report from USS Fessenden, Endorsement by Escort Division Nine, Photos of oil slick resulting from attack, ULTRA intercepts related to U-1062

U-1228 surrendered to USS Neal A. Scott May 11, 1945

Excerpt from War Diary of USS Sutton, Messages directing intercept of U-1228, Preliminary Interrogation Report

Photos by attacking aircraft, ASW-6 reports, photos of POWs aboard USS Bogue, photos taken from POWs, Report of Rescue Operations by USS Janssen and the Report of the Interrogation of Survivors of U-1229

U-2326 surrendered at sea to Allied forces May 11, 1945

Admiralty letter requesting information from C-in-C Rosyth and his reply including Anti-submarine Measures in force, Preliminary interrogation of U-2326 CO, Extract of U-2326 KTB


Watch the video: Soviet tanks engage German armor at Kursk August 1943, colorized