Henry Broadhurst

Henry Broadhurst


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Henry Broadhurst, the son of a stonemason, was born at Littlemore on 13th April, 1840. After a brief schooling he started work at the age of twelve. A brief spell as a gardener was followed by an apprenticeship as a stonemason in Oxford. A staunch Methodist, Broadhurst's work mainly involved repairing and enlarging churches and university colleges.

In the late 1850s Broadhurst moved to Norwich where he found work as a stonemason. In 1865 Broadhurst and his new wife, Eliza Olley, moved to London where he was involved in rebuilding the House of Commons.

While in London Broadhurst became involved the struggle for universal suffrage. He joined the Reform League and took part in several demonstrations and meetings in the build up to the passing of the 1867 Reform Act.

In 1872 Henry Broadhurst took part in the campaign to reduce the working week and an increase in the hourly wage paid in the building industry. Broadhurst soon emerged as one of the leaders of the stonemasons and took part in the negotiations with the employers. Broadhurst now gave up his work as a stonemason to become a full-time union official. Later that year Broadhurst represented the Stonemasons Union at the annual Trade Union Congress (TUC) and was elected to its Parliamentary Committee.

In 1873 Broadhurst was elected secretary of the Labour Representation League, an organisation that was attempting to enable working men to be elected to the House of Commons. The LBR sponsored thirteen trade union candidates in the 1874 General Election, and two of them, Alexander MacDonald and Thomas Burt, were elected as Lib-Labs MPs.

Broadhurst played an important role in the campaign to have the Masters and Servants Act repealed and in 1875 the Conservative government, led by Benjamin Disraeli, agreed to the TUC's proposals. As a result of the Conspiracy and Protection of Property Act was passed by Parliament in 1875, which secured the right to participate in peaceful picketing.

The following year Henry Broadhurst supported William Gladstone and his campaign against Bulgarian Atrocities. Broadhurst obtained the signatures of over 15,000 people, including many trade union leaders, to a petition which John Bright presented to Parliament.

In the 1880 General Election Broadhurst was elected as Liberal MP for Stoke-upon-Trent. Broadhurst joined Alexander MacDonald and Thomas Burt as Lib-Lab supporters of Gladstone's government. In the House of Commons Broadhurst led the campaign for a government commission to investigate working-class housing. In the 1885 General Election Broadhurst was elected for the Bordesley seat in Birmingham.

After the election, William Gladstone offered Broadhurst the post of Under-Secretary at the Home Office. When Broadhurst accepted the post he became the first working man to become a government minister. Broadhurst's loyal support of the Liberal government upset some trade union leaders. When Broadhurst argued against the eight-hour day, James Keir Hardie remarked that the minister was more Liberal than Labour.

At the 1889 Trade Union Congress Hardie argued that Henry Broadhurst was guilty of holding shares in a company that treated its workers badly. The following year, the TUC supported Hardie against Broadhurst by passing a resolution in favour of the eight-hour day. Broadhurst was especially hurt when he discovered that the Stonemasons Union had voted against him. In the 1892 General Election Broadhurst was defeated at West Nottingham. His objection to the eight-hour day had lost him the support of local workers and this enabled a local colliery owner to defeat him.

Broadhurst was opposed to women's suffrage. A young Beatrice Webb met him in September 1889: "He chatted on about socialism, trade unionism and his own complaints and showed every sign of being confidential. A commonplace person, hard-working no doubt, but a middle-class philistine to the backbone, appealing to the practical shrewdness and the high-flown but mediocre sentiments of the comfortably off working man. His view of women is typical of all his other views: he lives in platitudes and commonplaces."

Attempts to be elected in Grimsey in 1893 ended in failure but Broadhurst eventually won at Leicester in 1894. He held the seat until his retirement before the 1906 General Election.

Henry Broadhurst died at Cromer, Norfolk, on 11th October, 1911.


Henry Broadhurst -->

Henry Broadhurst (13 April 1840 – 11 October 1911) was a leading early British trade unionist and a Lib-Lab politician who sat in the House of Commons for various Midlands constituencies between 1880 and 1906.

Broadhurst was born in Littlemore, Oxford, the son of Thomas Broadhurst, a journeyman stonemason. [1] He followed his father into stonemasonry at the age of thirteen and during the late 1850s spent a considerable period travelling the south of England, attempting to find work. In 1865, he moved to London and worked on the Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster.

In 1872, Broadhurst was elected as the Chair of a Masons&apos Committee during an industrial dispute. After achieving a major victory, Broadhurst began working full-time for the Stonemasons Union. He also became the union&aposs delegate to the Trades Union Congress (TUC) and was elected to its Parliamentary Committee. In 1873, he became the secretary of the Labour Representation League.

At the 1874 general election, two candidates sponsored by the League were elected, but Broadhurst was unsuccessful at High Wycombe. In 1875, he was elected Secretary of the Parliamentary Committee of the TUC, the post which was later to become the General Secretaryship.

At the 1880 general election, Broadhurst was elected as the Liberal–Labour Member of Parliament for Stoke-upon-Trent. Within the House of Commons, he pushed through legislation enabling working men to act as Justices of the Peace, and for all Government contracts to include a "fair wage" clause. In 1884, he was appointed to the Royal Commission on the housing of the working class.

In 1885 general election, Broadhurst moved to represent Birmingham Bordesley. [2] He was appointed as Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department in the Liberal government, the first person from a working-class or labour movement background to hold a ministerial post. He was the first minister to be granted permission not to attend levees. Following his appointment, he resigned from his TUC post. William Ewart Gladstone attempted but failed to have his ministerial salary reduced.

For the 1886 general election, Broadhurst moved seats again, this time winning Nottingham West. Free of ministerial responsibilities, he was again elected Secretary of the Parliamentary Committee of the TUC, but became increasingly isolated as more left wing members, such as Keir Hardie, accused him of not sufficiently representing the interests of labour within Parliament. Following a defeat in a crucial vote at the 1890 TUC conference, and citing declining health, Broadhurst resigned the post.

In 1892, Broadhurst was appointed to a second Royal Commission, on the aged poor. He lost his seat at Nottingham West at the 1892 general election, and was also defeated at the 1893 Grimsby by-election. However, he returned to Parliament as MP for Leicester at the 1894 Leicester by-election, holding this seat as a Lib–Lab MP until 1906.

Following his retirement, Broadhurst moved to Norfolk, where he became an alderman. He died at the age of 71.

Broadhurst married Eliza Olley, daughter of Edward Olley a journeyman currier [1] at Norwich in 1859.


--> Broadhurst, Henry, 1840-1911

Born in 1840 educated at Littlemore Village School, Oxfordshire worked in a blacksmith's shop, then as a stonemason until 1872 Secretary, Labour Representative League, 1875 Secretary, Parliamentary Committee of the Trades Union Congress, 1875-1890 MP for Stoke-on-Trent, 1880-1885, Bordesley, 1885-1886, Nottingham, 1886-1892, and Leicester, 1894-1906 Under-Secretary of State, Home Department, 1886 served on Royal Commissions, including Reformatory and Industrial Schools, Housing of the Working Classes, and the Condition of the Aged Poor offered and refused Inspectorship of Factories and Workshops, 1882, and the Inspectorship of Canal Boats, 1884 JP and Alderman, County of Norfolk Poor Law Guardian, Erpingham Union member of Cromer Urban District Council Chairman, Lifeboat Committee founder of Tooting Common Club founder of the Golf Links, Cromer and Sheringham, Norfolk died 1911. Publications: Henry Broadhurst, M.P: the story of his life from a stonemason's bench to the Treasury bench told by himself (Hutchinson & Co., London, 1901) Handy book on household enfranchisement (1885).

From the guide to the BROADHURST, Rt Hon Henry, 1840-1911, MP, 1873-1910, (British Library of Political and Economic Science)

Role Title Holding Repository
referencedIn HOPKINSON H. FL 1925, 1925 British Library of Political and Economic Science
creatorOf BROADHURST, Rt Hon Henry, 1840-1911, MP, 1873-1910 British Library of Political and Economic Science
Relation Name
associatedWith Carrington, Charles Robert, Wynn-, 1843-1928, 3rd Baron Carrington and 1st Marquess of Lincolnshire, politician person
associatedWith Chamberlain, Joseph, 1836-1914 person
associatedWith Dilke, Sir, Charles Wentworth, 1843-1911, 2nd Baronet, politician and author person
associatedWith Duke, John, 1820-1894, 1st Baron Coleridge, Lord Chief Justice of England person
associatedWith Gladstone, William Ewart, 1809-1898 person
associatedWith Harcourt, Sir, William George Granville Venables, Vernon-, 1827-1904 person
associatedWith James, Henry, 1828-1911, 1st Baron James of Hereford, lawyer and statesman person
associatedWith Knollys, Francis, 1837-1924, 1st Viscount Knollys, Private Secretary to King Edward VII person
associatedWith Powell, George Herbert Croxden, 1856-1924 person
associatedWith Primrose, Archibald Philip, 1847-1929, 5th Earl of Rosebery, statesman and author person

Person

Ark ID: w6xb7g6s

SNAC ID: 32834321

Variant Names

Shared Related Resources

Broadhurst, Henry, 1840-1911


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From Graces Guide

1822 Born in Manchester, son of Daniel and Sarah Broadhurst Daniel was a merchant Ώ]

1841 Living in West Derby, Lancs, with Daniel Broadhurst 50, a merchant, Sarah Broadhurst 50, Robert Broadhurst 25, a merchant, Henry Broadhurst 15, Eliza Broadhurst 20, Frances Broadhurst 20 ΐ]

1853 Married Mary Margaret Brooks in Chorlton Α]

1871 In Aboyne, Aberdeenshire, a cotton . and magistrate, with Mary Margaret 43, Marion 13, Florence 9, John 6, Godfrey 5, Grace 2 Ζ]

1876 of the firm of Tootal, Broadhurst, Lee, and Company, Manufacturers, of Newton Heath, in the county of Lancaster, applied for a patent for the invention of "improvements in fancy weaving, and in the apparatus employed for such purposes." Η]

1885 Married Elizabeth Frances Butler in London ⎖]

1891 Retired cotton, silk and wool manufacturer, living in Leamington with Elizabeth F Broadhurst 52 and Ernest H Broadhurst 13 ⎗]


Correspondence, mainly to the Rt Hon Henry Broadhurst, MP, 1873-1910, from correspondents including the Rt Hon William Ewart Gladstone, Prime Minister the Rt Hon Joseph Chamberlain, MP the Rt Hon Sir William George Granville Venables Vernon-Harcourt, MP John Duke, 1st Baron Coleridge Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke Henry James, 1st Baron James of Hereford Francis Knollys, 1st Viscount Knollys George H Croxden Powell Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery and Charles Robert Wynn-Carrington, 1st Marquess of Lincolnshire. There is a name index in the catalogue.

Born in 1840 educated at Littlemore Village School, Oxfordshire worked in a blacksmith's shop, then as a stonemason until 1872 Secretary, Labour Representative League, 1875 Secretary, Parliamentary Committee of the Trades Union Congress, 1875-1890 MP for Stoke-on-Trent, 1880-1885, Bordesley, 1885-1886, Nottingham, 1886-1892, and Leicester, 1894-1906 Under-Secretary of State, Home Department, 1886 served on Royal Commissions, including Reformatory and Industrial Schools, Housing of the Working Classes, and the Condition of the Aged Poor offered and refused Inspectorship of Factories and Workshops, 1882, and the Inspectorship of Canal Boats, 1884 JP and Alderman, County of Norfolk Poor Law Guardian, Erpingham Union member of Cromer Urban District Council Chairman, Lifeboat Committee founder of Tooting Common Club founder of the Golf Links, Cromer and Sheringham, Norfolk died 1911.
Publications: Henry Broadhurst, M.P: the story of his life from a stonemason's bench to the Treasury bench told by himself (Hutchinson & Co., London, 1901) Handy book on household enfranchisement (1885).


Lynching

Julie Buckner Armstrong, Mary Turner and the Memory of Lynching (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2011).

Edwin T. Arnold, "What Virtue There Is in Fire": Cultural Memory and the Lynching of Sam Hose (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2009).

Matthew H. Bernstein, Screening a Lynching: The Leo Frank Case on Film and Television (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2009).

W. Fitzhugh Brundage, Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930 (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1993).

W. Fitzhugh Brundage, ed., Under Sentence of Death: Lynching in the South (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997).

Leonard Dinnerstein, The Leo Frank Case (New York: Columbia University Press, 1968 reprint, Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1987).

Mary Louise Ellis, "'Rain Down Fire': The Lynching of Sam Hose" (Ph.D. diss., Florida State University, 1992).

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Thirty Years of Lynching in the United States, 1889-1918 (New York: Arno Press, 1969).

Steve Oney, And the Dead Shall Rise: The Murder of Mary Phagan and the Lynching of Leo Frank (New York: Pantheon, 2003).

Stewart E. Tolnay and E. M. Beck, A Festival of Violence: An Analysis of Southern Lynchings, 1882-1930 (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1995).

Wallace H. Warren, "'The Best People in Town Won't Talk': The Moore's Ford Lynching of 1946 and Its Cover-Up," in Georgia in Black and White: Explorations in the Race Relations of a Southern State, 1865-1950 , ed. John C. Inscoe (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994).

Laura Wexler, Fire in a Canebrake: The Last Mass Lynching in America (New York: Scribner, 2003).


'The most cold-blooded, cowardly treachery': 22 murder cases that rocked Oregon

Oregon's homicide rate is about half the national average, a trend that has stayed pretty steady for decades.

But the state continues to produce the kind of shocking murders that both shake Oregonians’ sense of place and rivet the attention of people across the country.

Over the years these high-profile crimes have ranged from the twisted acts of serial killers to racially-driven attacks to, just maybe, a “deep state” political assassination.

Below we take a look at 22 Oregon murder cases that helped define their times.

Tourist boats at Chinese Massacre Cove (AP)

Hells Canyon massacre

In May 1887, a band of thieves ambushed Chinese-immigrant gold miners in remote Hells Canyon. They shot to death at least 34 miners, hacked up the bodies with axes and tossed the remains into the Snake River. The killers then absconded with the miners' gold.

"It was the most cold-blooded, cowardly treachery I have ever heard tell of on this coast," said Idaho judge Joseph K. Vincent, who was hired to investigate the murders.

The following year, a grand jury indicted six Wallowa County residents. Three of the accused disappeared and were never apprehended. Those who remained were acquitted at the end of a brief trial held in Enterprise, Oregon.

To head off a diplomatic furor, the U.S. Congress eventually paid $276,619.75 to the Chinese government “out of humane consideration and without reference to the question of liability.”

The killings, it was widely believed even at the time, weren’t about the gold.

"It was really a savage act of racial hatred," Oregon historian and author R. Gregory Nokes said in 2011.

The area where the murders occurred is now called Chinese Massacre Cove. A granite memorial there declares, “Site of the 1887 massacre of as many as 34 Chinese gold miners. No one was held accountable.”

Creffield (Oregonian file/Oregon State Archive)

The charismatic Edmund Creffield started his own church, the Brides of Christ, in 1903. The former Salvation Army worker announced that one of his female followers would be the mother of the reborn Christ, but that first "he needed to purify them by laying his hands on them" -- while they were naked, of course.

The German immigrant proved remarkably successful at recruiting members to his Corvallis-based "holy roller" church -- including married women. "Soon Creffield had a reputation for breaking up homes, and a flock consisting largely of women," wrote Offbeat Oregon History in 2011.

A state conviction for adultery made Creffield a target for traditional moralists. So the church leader moved to the coastal town of Waldport and declared that he was the reborn Christ himself.

But he couldn’t escape his reputation. In 1906, George Mitchell, the brother of church member Esther Mitchell, walked up behind Creffield on a Seattle street, put the barrel of a pistol against the back of the notorious religious man’s head and pulled the trigger. Creffield fell in a heap, instantly dead.

“I got my man and I am in jail here,” Mitchell reportedly said in a telegraph message sent from the police station.

Mitchell’s murder trial proved a sensation -- with most observers highly sympathetic to the defendant. “Creffield was a degenerate of the worst sort,” Portland’s district attorney wrote to the Seattle prosecutor. “He practiced unspeakable brutalities on ignorant and unsophisticated girls.”

Mitchell, like Creffield before him, appeared to enjoy the hero-worship. During the trial in Seattle, wrote Oregon historian Stewart Holbrook years later, the defendant “seemed the happiest person in the room.”

The jury quickly acquitted Mitchell, and he was “mobbed by friends and well-wishers” in the courtroom. But he wouldn’t get to celebrate for long. Two days later, as he waited at the King Street station for a train to Portland, his sister Esther strode up to him, pulled out a pearl-handled pistol and shot him. He died as the train arrived.

Westfall in the late 1960s. (Oregonian file)

In 1912, Asa Carey, the hard-drinking marshal of tiny Westfall, lost his job to Jasper Westfall, scion to the town founder.

Angered, Carey decided to “shoot up” the main street and thereby prove that his successor was afraid to arrest him. When the new marshal confronted him, the drunken Carey threatened to kill Westfall.

“Finally, when Carey made a pass for his gun,” The Oregonian reported, “the marshal fired at him and missed.”

Carey responded by unleashing three shots, killing Westfall. Soon thereafter, Carey was arrested and put on trial for murder.

“The courtroom was crowded to the doors, and many stood in the hallway to hear the closing argument of the prosecution and of counsel for the defense,” The Oregonian wrote. The trial, with its tantalizing narrative about two lawmen pitted against one another, made headlines around the state, introducing many Oregonians to the little Malheur County burgh.

The jury convicted Carey, and deputies trundled the cussing former marshal from the courtroom.

The town of Westfall would never again receive such widespread attention. By the 1960s, it had become a ghost town, with only two remaining residents.

Willamette River (The Oregonian)

Portland's torso murder

The body parts, wrapped in newspaper and tied up in burlap sacks, started showing up in the Willamette River in April of 1946. The sacks bobbed to shore between Portland and Oregon City over several months. They contained the remains of a middle-aged woman.

The victim’s head, The Oregonian wrote, was swaddled in a page from the Oct. 1, 1944, edition of the paper and “another page with a date of September 16 -- no year -- which adds more confusion to the date of death.” The skull had been fractured.

Comparisons were instantly made to Cleveland's infamous Torso Murders, which had fascinated and horrified people across the country in the 1930s and remained unsolved, despite the fact that famous gangbuster Eliot Ness led the case.

Could the “Mad Butcher of Kingsbury Run,” Portlanders wondered, have made it all the way to the Rose City?

Throughout 1946 and beyond, the mystery dominated conversation in the city’s watering holes, drawing rooms and hair salons.

As rumors about the body parts swirled, a Newberg resident boasted that he knew "all about the torso murder case." But when Portland police took him seriously and hustled him into the station at 5 th and Taylor, he insisted, "I just wanted the publicity."

The man was released, soon to be replaced by other attention seekers.

Local and state law enforcement spent years pursuing the case, but the victim was never identified and no one was ever charged.

J.D. Chandler and Theresa Griffin Kennedy, authors of the 2016 book "Murder and Scandal in Prohibition Portland," speculate that local beauty Anna Schrader might have been the victim. They point out that Schrader, whose extramarital affair with a powerful Portland police lieutenant made headlines and rocked the police department in 1929, disappeared at the same time the body parts began washing ashore -- and that she had recently threatened to restart the old scandal.

There’s also this: During that spring and summer of 1946, a classified ad ran repeatedly in The Oregonian that read, “Anyone who knows the whereabouts of Ann Schrader please write N472 Oregonian.”

Gladys Broadhurst (The Oregonian)

Gladys and her cowboy

In October 1946, a 23-year-old ranch hand named Alvin Lee Williams used a wrench to attack his boss, the wealthy Jordan Valley rancher and chiropractor Willis Broadhurst. Williams then finished his victim with a shotgun blast.

Why did the young cowboy commit murder? He insisted that Broadhurst’s wife Gladys, with whom he was having an affair, put him up to it.

The revelations at Gladys Broadhurst’s trial in Malheur County were so shocking that her defense attorney, Patrick Gallagher, called the courtroom atmosphere “supercharged.” Jurors learned that the 40-year-old Gladys, typically described by reporters as “comely,” had been married seven times, was addicted to sleeping pills and, with the adultery, had “lapsed back into a moral vacuum.”

Gallagher argued that Gladys had broken off the affair with Williams and that, while drunk on whisky, the ranch hand had killed the 51-year-old chiropractor “to get back to her again.”

“There was no deal to kill the doctor until he drank the whisky,” Gallagher said in court. “Then he was the boy with the Buffalo Bill whiskers, the boy with the buckaroo complex, the boy who had slept with the boss’s wife.”

The defense attorney accused Williams of giving perjured testimony in an attempt to “walk around the gas chamber.”

The trial raged for 16 days, with Gallagher, according to one news account, waging “a brilliant battle on [his client’s] behalf.”

But Gallagher’s efforts weren’t enough. The jury convicted Gladys Broadhurst of first-degree murder and recommended life imprisonment at the Oregon State Penitentiary. (Williams was separately convicted of second-degree murder “on his own plea.”)

Wrote The Oregonian: “The unanimous verdict [against Broadhurst] . seemed to stun the pretty defendant, who walked into the courtroom confidently in the same two-piece black dress and small, veil-like headpiece she had worn during the trial.”

The newspaper noted that the state had “never sentenced a woman to death.”

Gladys Broadhurst was paroled in 1956, Williams the following year.

Virginia Harington (Oregonian file)

The Harington bedroom battle

It could have been a scene from the musical “Chicago,” except set 2,000 miles to the west. Lane County lumber-mill owner Gene Harington was found in bed on Jan. 28, 1947, with two .38-caliber bullets in his head. The 23-year-old Virginia Harington, sporting a blank look, claimed that her husband had threatened her with the gun. She said she had wrestled it away from him and ultimately shot him in self-defense.

The evidence did not appear to support her version of events. The police officers who were first on the scene would testify that “the bed clothes around [Gene] Harington’s body were not mussed as they should have been in the event of a scuffle.” And the gun was fired twice, from more than 2 feet away, with the bullets ending up embedded in Gene Harington’s pillow. The prosecution argued that he had been shot while he was sleeping.

Lane County District Attorney Ed Luckey “asserted that one bullet passed through the slain man’s right eyelid, proving he was asleep.”


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APA Citation

Broadhurst, William Henry. (1900). Broadhurst collection of photographic postcards of New South Wales, ca. 1900-1927. http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-152754957

MLA Citation

Broadhurst, William Henry. Broadhurst collection of photographic postcards of New South Wales, ca. 1900-1927 [picture] / William Henry Broadhurst 1900 <http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-152754957>

Australian/Harvard Citation

Broadhurst, William Henry. 1900, Broadhurst collection of photographic postcards of New South Wales, ca. 1900-1927 [picture] / William Henry Broadhurst <http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-152754957>

Wikipedia Citation
Broadhurst collection of photographic postcards of New South Wales, ca. 1900-1927 [picture] / William Henry Broadhurst

Collection of photographs of New South Wales locations published by Broadhurst. Locations are mainly in the Sydney and Blue Mountains regions and include churches, post offices and the Sydney Botanical Gardens.

William Henry Broadhurst travelled to various scenic locations in New South Wales to photograph subjects suitable for publication as postcards. Many postcards were hand coloured by his daughters prior to sale.

Title devised by cataloguer.

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British Library of Political and Economic Science

Born in 1840 educated at Littlemore Village School, Oxfordshire worked in a blacksmith's shop, then as a stonemason until 1872 Secretary, Labour Representative League, 1875 Secretary, Parliamentary Committee of the Trades Union Congress, 1875-1890 MP for Stoke-on-Trent, 1880-1885, Bordesley, 1885-1886, Nottingham, 1886-1892, and Leicester, 1894-1906 Under-Secretary of State, Home Department, 1886 served on Royal Commissions, including Reformatory and Industrial Schools, Housing of the Working Classes, and the Condition of the Aged Poor offered and refused Inspectorship of Factories and Workshops, 1882, and the Inspectorship of Canal Boats, 1884 JP and Alderman, County of Norfolk Poor Law Guardian, Erpingham Union member of Cromer Urban District Council Chairman, Lifeboat Committee founder of Tooting Common Club founder of the Golf Links, Cromer and Sheringham, Norfolk died 1911.
Publications: Henry Broadhurst, M.P: the story of his life from a stonemason's bench to the Treasury bench told by himself (Hutchinson & Co., London, 1901) Handy book on household enfranchisement (1885).

Scope and content/abstract:

Correspondence, mainly to the Rt Hon Henry Broadhurst, MP, 1873-1910, from correspondents including the Rt Hon William Ewart Gladstone, Prime Minister the Rt Hon Joseph Chamberlain, MP the Rt Hon Sir William George Granville Venables Vernon-Harcourt, MP John Duke, 1 st Baron Coleridge Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke Henry James, 1 st Baron James of Hereford Francis Knollys, 1 st Viscount Knollys George H Croxden Powell Archibald Philip Primrose, 5 th Earl of Rosebery and Charles Robert Wynn-Carrington, 1 st Marquess of Lincolnshire. There is a name index in the catalogue.

Language/scripts of material: English

System of arrangement:

The correspondence is arranged chronologically.

Conditions governing access:

This collection has been microfilmed and the originals withdrawn from public use for preservation purposes. The microfilm must be used. Apply to Archivist for originals.

Conditions governing reproduction:

Apply to Archivist for copyright details. Microfilm copies only.

Physical characteristics:

Printed handlist available.

Appraisal, destruction and scheduling information:

Previously listed as Coll L/SR 151.

Immediate source of acquisition:

Existence and location of originals:

Existence and location of copies:

Microfilm made available by Follet Preservation Microfilming Project, 1998. Films are held on open access in the Library (Archives MF 65-66).

The BLPES holds a typescript of Broadhurst's autobiography (Ref: Coll Misc 0269) there is correspondence with him in the papers of Alfred George Gardiner (Ref: Gardiner/1/4), the Frederic Harrison papers (Ref: Harrison/1/22), and the papers of the Independent Labour Party (Ref: ILP/4/1894).

The Bishopsgate Institute, London, holds letters to George Howell, MP, 1873-1886 the British Library, London, has correspondence with William Ewart Gladstone, 1878-1896 (Ref: Add MSS 44456-524) the Bodleian Library, Oxford University, contains correspondence with John Wodehouse, 1 st Earl of Kimberley, 1882-1883 (Ref: MSS Eng a 2013-14, b 2047-49, c 3933-4514, d 2439-92, e 2790-97), the TUC Library at the University of North London holds two manuscript volumes relating to Broadhurst's life and work, 1872-1905 (Ref GB 1924 Broadhurst).

Archivist's note: Sources: Who's Who 1897-1996 (A & C Black, 1996) British Library On-Line Public Access Catalogue 97 Historical Manuscripts Commission National Register of Archives. Compiled by Sarah Aitchison as part of the RSLP AIM25 project.

Rules or conventions: Compiled in compliance with General International Standard Archival Description, ISAD(G), second edition, 2000 National Council on Archives Rules for the Construction of Personal, Place and Corporate Names, 1997.

Date(s) of descriptions: Sep 2000

INDEX ENTRIES Subjects Politics | Political science

Personal names Broadhurst | Henry | 1840-1911 | Trades Unionist and politician Carrington | Charles Robert | Wynn- | 1843-1928 | 3rd Baron Carrington and 1st Marquess of Lincolnshire | politician x Wynn-Carrington | Charles Robert x Carrington | 3rd Baron x Lincolnshire | 1st Marquess Chamberlain | Joseph | 1836-1914 | statesman Dilke | Sir | Charles Wentworth | 1843-1911 | 2nd Baronet | politician and author Duke | John | 1820-1894 | 1st Baron Coleridge | Lord Chief Justice of England x Coleridge | 1st Baron Gladstone | William Ewart | 1809-1898 | statesman Harcourt | Sir | William George Granville Venables | Vernon- | 1827-1904 | Knight | statesman x Vernon-Harcourt | Sir | William George Granville Venables James | Henry | 1828-1911 | 1st Baron James of Hereford | lawyer and statesman x James of Hereford | 1st Baron Knollys | Francis | 1837-1924 | 1st Viscount Knollys | Private Secretary to King Edward VII x Knollys | 1st Viscount Powell | George Herbert Croxden | 1856-1924 | poet and writer Primrose | Archibald Philip | 1847-1929 | 5th Earl of Rosebery | statesman and author x Rosebery | 5th Earl of


Trades Union Congress (TUC) Library Collections at London Metropolitan University

Born in 1840 educated at Littlemore Village School, Oxfordshire worked in a blacksmith's shop, then as a stonemason until 1872 Secretary, Labour Representative League, 1875 Secretary, Parliamentary Committee of the Trades Union Congress, 1875-1890 MP for Stoke-on-Trent, 1880-1885, Bordesley, 1885-1886, Nottingham, 1886-1892, and Leicester, 1894-1906 Under-Secretary of State, Home Department, 1886 served on Royal Commissions, including Reformatory and Industrial Schools, Housing of the Working Classes, and the Condition of the Aged Poor offered and refused Inspectorship of Factories and Workshops, 1882, and the Inspectorship of Canal Boats, 1884 JP and Alderman, County of Norfolk Poor Law Guardian, Erpingham Union member of Cromer Urban District Council Chairman, Lifeboat Committee founder of Tooting Common Club founder of the Golf Links, Cromer and Sheringham, Norfolk died 1911.
Publications: Henry Broadhurst, M.P: the story of his life from a stonemason's bench to the Treasury bench told by himself (Hutchinson & Co., London, 1901) Handy book on household enfranchisement (1885).

Scope and content/abstract:

The collection comprises two manuscript volumes relating to Henry Broadhurst's life and work. Volume 1 contains minutes of the Advanced Liberal Association of the Borough of Greenwich 30 May 1874 Broadhurst's statement on collectivism an address to the cooperative society on 'Old age pensions' a draft letter ' to the editor of the Eastern Daily Press, 1891 a 'Life of Henry Broadhurst' including copies of several letters sent to Broadhurst (last dated 1905). Volume 2 contains minutes of the Gas Men's Defence Committee, 1872-1874, of which Broadhurst was Secretary, with two lists of subscribers, many of them women. There are also a number of loose papers in this volume relating to the Committee including minutes of a sub-committee, 1872-1874 accounts of relief granted leaflets issued by the Committee an expense sheet, 1873 subscriptions sheets and cuttings regarding a gas stokers' case and the Master and Servants Act.

Language/scripts of material: English.

System of arrangement:

As indicated in Scope and Content.

Conditions governing access:

Open to bona fide researchers at the discretion of the TUC Librarian.

Conditions governing reproduction:

At the discretion of the TUC Librarian and subject to copyright conditions.

Physical characteristics:

Appraisal, destruction and scheduling information:

Immediate source of acquisition:

Transferred to the University of North London with the TUC Collections.

Existence and location of originals:

Existence and location of copies:

The British Library of Political and Economic Science (BLPES) holds correspondence, mainly to the Rt Hon Henry Broadhurst, MP, 1873-1910, from correspondents including the Rt Hon William Ewart Gladstone, Prime Minister the Rt Hon Joseph Chamberlain, MP the Rt Hon Sir William George Granville Venables Vernon-Harcourt, MP John Duke, 1st Baron Coleridge Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke Henry James, 1st Baron James of Hereford Francis Knollys, 1st Viscount Knollys George H Croxden Powell Archibald Philip Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery and Charles Robert Wynn-Carrington, 1st Marquess of Lincolnshire. The BLPES also holds a typescript of Broadhurst's autobiography (Ref: Coll Misc 0269) there is correspondence with him in the papers of Alfred George Gardiner (Ref: Gardiner/1/4), the Frederic Harrison papers (Ref: Harrison/1/22), and the papers of the Independent Labour Party (Ref: ILP/4/1894). The Bishopsgate Institute, London, holds letters to George Howell, MP, 1873-1886 The British Library, London, has correspondence with William Ewart Gladstone, 1878-1896 (Ref: Add MSS 44456-524) the Bodleian Library, Oxford University, contains correspondence with John Wodehouse, 1st Earl of Kimberley, 1882-1883 (Ref: MSS Eng a 2013-14, b 2047-49, c 3933-4514, d 2439-92, e 2790-97).

Archivist's note: Compiled by Janet Foster, and revised by Alan Kucia as part of the RSLP AIM25 Project. Source: Bellamy & Saville (eds): Dictionary of Labour Biography Vol II (1974) pp 62-68.

Rules or conventions: Compiled in compliance with General International Standard Archival Description, ISAD(G), second edition, 2000 National Council on Archives Rules for the Construction of Personal, Place and Corporate Names, 1997.

Date(s) of descriptions: March 2001

INDEX ENTRIES Subjects Trade unions | Labour relations

Personal names Broadhurst | Henry | 1840-1911 | Trades Unionist and politician

Corporate names Advanced Liberal Association of the Borough of Greenwich Gas Men's Defence Committee

Places Greenwich | London | England | UK | Western Europe | Europe


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